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Description: Guess what?! Super-Awesome Sylvia, star of Super-Awesome Sylvia’s Super-Awesome Maker Show has a new book for young makers! It’s called, “Sylvia’s Super-Awesome Project Book: Super Simple Arduino!” The book is a fun and colorful introduction to Arduino microcontrollers and programming, written and illustrated by kid engineer Super-Awesome Sylvia. It has 3 great projects to get started on an Arduino adventure, plus lots of ideas and resources for even more experiments.

Three super-awesome projects:

  • PROJECT ONE: Simple Strobe - A controllable strobe that lets you stop time!
  • PROJECT TWO: R.I.F.F. - A “Randomly Influenced Finger Flute” - a musical instrument that anyone can play!
  • PROJECT THREE: TheTapper - A speaker can play music of course, but it can be an input device too!

We’ve also developed the Sylvia’s Super Awesome Kit (not included) that includes all the parts needed to complete the experiments in the book. As Sylvia says, “Get out there and make something!”

Info:

  • Author & Illustrator: Sylvia “Super-Awesome” Todd
  • Publisher: Constructing Modern Knowledge Press
  • Paperback: 44 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0-98915-116-0
  • ISBN-13: 978-0989151160

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5

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6 of 6 found this helpful:

Clear and instructive, even for idiot like me

Book explained Arduino functions, hook up and sketches at the bottom basic level. As a 66 year old, I need to start at the child’s level (my level!) when learning about anything digital. After performing the experiments in the book, and learning, quite easily, how to correct my sketch errors, I successfully applied the Arduino to programmable lighting for my model railroad structures. I plan to also use the units for model animation with motor, light, and sound control. This was an easy, but thorough start for the compleate ignoramus.

2 of 9 found this helpful:

Useless book.

I work with high-school kids age 12-15. They all laughed about this book. A couple of remarks from these kids: “Why does this girl think we need this assumed funny layout?” “Three very simple projects. Why not more and more mature projects? This is fun for not more than two afternoons.”

Never treat teenagers as primary school kids. Instead, treat them respectfully as the adolescents they are. This book makes a classic mistake.