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Description: The SparkFun PicoBoard Starter Kit is your go-to source to begin learning everything about the SparkFun PicoBoard and the Scratch programming environment. This kit includes your very own PicoBoard, multiple pieces of hardware to get you started, and connecting components to get you hooked up. Using the Scratch programming language, you can easily create simple interactive programs based on the input from sensors. The PicoBoard incorporates a light sensor, sound sensor, a button and a slider, as well as four additional inputs that can sense electrical resistance via included cables.

The on-line Getting Started Guide (found in the Documents section below) contains step by step instructions of how to set up your PicoBoard and how to program it in the Scratch programming environment. We have supplied plenty of detailed images on how to get started.

This kit will not require any soldering and is recommended for all ages interested in getting started with programming. So if you are an educators or even a beginner, the SparkFun Picoboard Starter Kit is a great way to get into the very basics of programming and reading sensors!

Note: The PicoBoard is a derivative work of the Scratch Sensor Board.

Kit Includes:

Documents:

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Customer Comments

Customer Reviews

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0 of 1 found this helpful:

Driver/plugin issues sink it

This could be exceedingly cool. And if you can get it to work it IS cool. But it relies on drivers and a browser plug-in which, in my experience, don’t play well together. The result is that the SW often can’t find the board, causing the target audience to just give up and stuff it in a drawer. For this to really engage a newbie, it must be rock solid, but instead the flaky connection is the product’s achilles heel. Certainly, part of the blame falls on Windows' horrid USB architecture, but all my very-computer-literate 12 yr old son knows is that he followed the instructions and plugged it in and that it doesn’t work.

Related Tutorials

Using the SparkFun PicoBoard and Scratch

November 11, 2014

Here are a few tips in using the PicoBoard with Scratch. The PicoBoard allows us to write Scratch programs that interact with a variety of sensors on the PicoBoard. These sensors include: sound, light, a slider, a push button, and 4 external sensors (A, B, C, and D).