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Description: This is the fantastically easy to use sensor from Maxbotix. We are extremely pleased with the size, quality, and ease of use of this little range finder. The serial interface is a bit odd (it's RS232 instead of standard TTL), but the PWM and Analog interfaces will allow any micro to listen easily enough. The sensor provides very accurate readings of 0 to 255 inches (0 to 6.45m) in 1 inch increments with little or no dead zone!

Maxbotix is offering the EZ0, EZ1, EZ2, EZ3, and EZ4 with progressively narrower beam angles allowing the sensor to match the application. Please see beam width explanation below.

Control up to 10 sensors with only two pins! Checkout the Maxbotix EZ1 FAQ listed below.

Features:

  • 42kHz Ultrasonic sensor
  • Operates from 2.5-5.5V
  • Low 2mA supply current
  • 20Hz reading rate
  • RS232 Serial Output - 9600bps
  • Analog Output - 10mV/inch
  • PWM Output - 147uS/inch
  • Small, light weight module

Documents:

Checkout Mikey Sklar's flame-based trampoline, the high-lighter, using the EZ1!

Comments 4 comments

  • The beam-width explanation link is not an explanation. It looks like an advertisement.

    • i’m choosing based on beam width (i used an EZ-1, which worked just great, but foudn the beam wider than i wanted) and puzzled out the datasheet (which is dense, but complete).

      the key is the diagram at the bottom lower right of the first page.

      there’s a paragraph that ought to be there, they assume you know that: sonar (sound) has to reflect off the thing you want it to “see” and, intuitively, if the thing is very thin it is hard to see at a distance.

      the four diagrams show the result of “seeing” the target (A, B, C, D) described. A, the ¼" rod – very thin!! – can be seen out to about 4 feet (at 5V). It can see it not only when pointed directly at it, but when the thing is up to approx. 1 foot to either side of straight ahead. The implication is that beyond 4 feet, it cannot see something that thin. this is entirely reasonable, and excellent performance.

      For D, the 11" wide board, the EZ can see it up to 20 feet.

      They imply – and i can verify – that their test of side-to-side beam width applies also to up-and-down, in other words, the beam is more or less like a… q-tip? propane torch flame? the beam pattern is a 3-dimensional space, hard to represent on paper.

      its a great product. I’m using PWM and interrupts on the trailing edge and getting very good haptic feedback from an EZ-1. I will buy the EZ-3 for the narrower beam.

      Cross-posting this to the EZ-1 comments because that part seems more popular.

  • Will this sensor change when something moves on the other side of glass?


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