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Description: The KTA-223 Relay Board is a USB or RS485 controlled module that can interface a PC to eight or more SPDT relays. This could be very useful for controlling real world devices - such as lights and sprinkler systems - and reading sensors or monitoring switches and other digital signals.

The controller is based on the hardware of the extremely popular Arduino platform. It can be programmed as a stand-alone controller using the free, open source Arduino environment. Internally, the controller is “shield-compatible”, allowing the use of many extension boards designed for the Arduino Deumilanove.

The on-board relays are capable of switching up to 5A at 250VAC, 10A at 120VAC and 10A at 24VDC, but the PCB traces can only handle up to about 5A.

With the default firmware, a simple ASCII protocol allows control from Windows/Mac/Linux using either USB Virtual COM drivers or RS485. Additionally, multiple devices can be connected to one RS485 bus, allowing control of many devices from one USB port.

A large number of mating screw terminals are included with this product.  USB cable not included.

Note: To get this to work with the R3 version of the Arduino Ethernet shield you will need to connect Pin 1 of the ICSP header to D12, Pin 3 to D13 and Pin4 to D11.

Features:

  • 8 Relay Outputs 5A 250VAC
  • 4 Opto-Isolated Inputs 5-30VDC
  • 3 Analog Inputs (10 bit)
  • Connections via Pluggable Screw Terminals
  • 0-5V or 0-20mA Analog Inputs, Jumper Selectable
  • 5A Relay Switching
  • Power Indicator LED
  • All enclosed in Professional looking plastic case
  • Arduino Compatible
  • Accepts Arduino Shields (Ethernet / XBee)
  • USB Virtual COM or RS485 Input
  • Easily connect multiple units far apart by RS485
  • Updated firmware - fixes a bug with the Relay Status command (status of wrong relay was reported)

Documents:

Comments 10 comments

  • I built an Android App for the KTA-223 and put it on Google Play. The app can be found here. All you need is an OTG cable. More features coming in the coming weeks.

  • Check out this tutorial on using this with a WiFi shield and a couple of other SFE bits to get internet controlled relays.

  • Does any one know if it’s possible to add wire in parallel to the board trace to increase the current rating of the relays?

  • Can you check the link “Example I2C firmware” ? It doesn’t work for me.

  • FYI I just finished building a project that uses this product in combination with the wixel arduino shield and 2 wixels. Pressing buttons in one location causes one standalone wixel to send the wixel that’s stuck to this relay box (via the shield) a message via RF. The receiving wixel sends a serial message to the relay box saying which relay to turn on/off. Works like a charm. I thought I’d have to do some wixel programming and some arduino, but it turns out it only needed wixel stuff. I’ll be posting info on the project, along with the wixel app soon. Just thought I’d let people know that it’s possible. Only issue is that the case doesn’t fit back on the relay box, since the wixel sticks up too high.

  • Worked as an adruino for a day, then I would not allow upload? Any Ideas?

    • Have you tried to re-flash the bootloader on the ATmega328p via the ISP/ICSP connector labeled K6?

  • Jeff Baron:

    The documentation for this module “recommends” the connection of simple electronic circuitry of various forms to the outputs of the relays in order to protect the unit from voltage spikes from large inductive loads.
    It looks - from the pictures - like the relay outputs are wired to connections inside of the unit (as well as to the normal outside connections) in order to facilitate the installation of the capacitors, resistors, and diodes inside of the unit.
    Is this the case? Thanks.
    Hi
    If you are referring to the holes near each relay with a + next to one of them then this is not the case as these are the holes for the coils of different sized relays (SSRs) for a different version of this product.
    There are holes under the Green terminal plug sockets which do connect to the contacts, these are right on the edge of the board, however it is probably best to connect any extra components outside the enclosure.

  • The documentation for this module “recommends” the connection of simple electronic circuitry of various forms to the outputs of the relays in order to protect the unit from voltage spikes from large inductive loads.<br />
    <br />
    It looks - from the pictures - like the relay outputs are wired to connections inside of the unit (as well as to the normal outside connections) in order to facilitate the installation of the capacitors, resistors, and diodes inside of the unit.<br />
    <br />
    Is this the case? Thanks.

  • This seems like it would be perfect for making environmental controls for a vivarium/terrarium.. (temp and humidity sensors, light and mister controls).


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