Stepper Motor Driver - Retail

This is the same product as our EasyDriver Stepper Motor Driver. The difference is this version comes in fancy clamshell packaging meant for our distributors that need it. Regular customers are welcome to order, but we want to limit the amount of extra packaging finding its way into the trash heap.

The EasyDriver is a simple to use stepper motor driver, compatible with anything that can output a digital 0 to 5V pulse (or 0 to 3.3V pulse if you solder SJ2 closed on the EasyDriver). EasyDriver requires a 7V to 20V supply to power the motor and can power any voltage of stepper motor. The EasyDriver has an on board voltage regulator for the digital interface that can be set to 5V or 3.3V. Connect a 4-wire stepper motor and a microcontroller and you’ve got precision motor control! EasyDriver drives bi-polar motors, and motors wired as bi-polar. I.e. 4,6, or 8 wire stepper motors. On this version (v4.4) we fixed the silk error on the min/max adjustment.

This is the newest version of EasyDriver V4 co-designed with Brian Schmalz. It provides much more flexibility and control over your stepper motor, when compared to older versions. The microstep select (MS1 and MS2) pins of the A3967 are broken out allowing adjustments to the microstepping resolution. The sleep and enable pins are also broken out for further control.

Note: Do not connect or disconnect a motor while the driver is energized. This will cause permanent damage to the A3967 IC.

Note: This product is a collaboration with Brian Schmalz. A portion of each sales goes back to them for product support and continued development.

  • A3967 microstepping driver
  • MS1 and MS2 pins broken out to change microstepping resolution to full, half, quarter and eighth steps (defaults to eighth)
  • Compatible with 4, 6, and 8 wire stepper motors of any voltage
  • Adjustable current control from 150mA/phase to 750mA/phase
  • Power supply range from 7V to 20V. The higher the voltage, the higher the torque at high speeds

Stepper Motor Driver - Retail Product Help and Resources

Core Skill: Soldering

This skill defines how difficult the soldering is on a particular product. It might be a couple simple solder joints, or require special reflow tools.

1 Soldering

Skill Level: Noob - Some basic soldering is required, but it is limited to a just a few pins, basic through-hole soldering, and couple (if any) polarized components. A basic soldering iron is all you should need.
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Core Skill: Robotics

This skill concerns mechanical and robotics knowledge. You may need to know how mechanical parts interact, how motors work, or how to use motor drivers and controllers.

2 Robotics

Skill Level: Rookie - You will be required to know some basics about motors, basic motor drivers and how simple robotic motion can be accomplished.
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Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

2 Programming

Skill Level: Rookie - You will need a better fundamental understand of what code is, and how it works. You will be using beginner-level software and development tools like Arduino. You will be dealing directly with code, but numerous examples and libraries are available. Sensors or shields will communicate with serial or TTL.
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Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
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Customer Comments

  • I am having terrible problems with high currents and Easydriver and already fried two of them (with sparks and smoke coming out of the main IC and the chip getting a huge bump from the “explosion”). both are related to excessive current requirements but I thought EasyDriver limited the max current to 750mA irrespective of motor demands or PSU supply. Does it need any current restrictor and why (since other drivers do not need this)? If it does, any suggestion would be appreciated.

    In both cases, I used 24V 1.6A PSU and motor was either 5 or 24V with around 1.2 amp per winding. They both worked fine without a load but, under a load (as it drew more current - I assume) the Easydriver blew up.

    • The motor will pull as much current as it needs. If it pulls more than 750mA through the Easy Driver you will blow the Easy Driver. For a stepper that uses 1.2A I would check out the Big Easy Driver. The boards have thermal protection, but trying to pull more current through them will fry them.

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