Marche

Member Since: April 2, 2010

Country: United States

Profile

Spoken Languages

English

Programming Languages

C, C++, Python

Interests

Programming, tinkering, and having fun.

  • Product TOL-07819 | about 3 years ago

    I can confirm these will fit Ayoue 937/937+ irons as well.
    this is the tip that came with my iron, and according to the replacement tip catalog, these will fit in any leaded Ayoue station except the 938.

  • Product TOL-09672 | about 3 years ago

    AFAIK Aoyue stations are clones.
    I’m loving my Aoyue int 937+, and it was more than half the price of an actual hakko station.
    From what I was able to gather they are nearly the same thing, even the replacement parts are interchangeable.
    If the knock-off is as solid as the real thing then why should we shun the well made knock-off? I can do without “hakko” on the face of my station if it means I have money left over for parts and stripboard :-)

  • Product TOL-09672 | about 3 years ago

    I’ve got a 45Watt Aoyue iron myself, and I really haven’t needed the extra power. I’ve desoldered heatsinks from an RoHS motherboard with my 937+, it just takes some extra heat and time to liquefy the solder.
    45W is plenty for everything I’ve used it for, and if you’re going to be making instead of salvaging, you’ll be fine.

  • Product TOL-09672 | about 3 years ago

    I know this is a necropost, but if anyone is wondering I can vouch for the Aoyue station.
    I have the 937+, which is nearly the same, the difference being a LED display that shows the current heating element temp. I’ve used mine for hours on end with zero issues, and most of it’s power-on time has been spent at ~390C for desoldering lead-free and heatsinked parts. The stock tip is still goin' strong too :)

  • Tutorial - Notes on the STK500 Serial Bootloader | about 3 years ago

    What would you like to do specifically?
    Under emacs or geany you can set a custom build command, which I’ve set to run a script that tries to find a makefile in the directory above the current one, compiles using that makefile, runs objcopy on the resulting binary to get a hex dump, and then flashes my arduino using avrdude.
    Most of this was modeled on what the arduino ide does. You can get it to show exactly what commands are being run during the build process by holding shift while you press the upload button. (Make sure you get GCC’s options right, otherwise your code will be HUGE!)

No public wish lists :(