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Member #1388551

Member Since: June 11, 2018

Country: United States

  • Hey folks, I bought a few of these and tested them. These results may be helpful to those who plan to use them.

    I used a regulated DC power supply, resistors, and multimeter to measure voltage and current readings. Circuit: DC supply to series resistor in series with LED. Note: VLED and ILED changes based on color its cycling through.

    With Vsupply of 3V and Series resistor of 330 ohm (322.5 actually): VLED=2.11V to 2.72V, Imax=2.72mA, dim lighting

    With Vsupply of 4.5V and series resistor of 330 ohm (322.5 actually): VLED=2.43V to 3.05V, Imax=6.42mA, dim lighting

    With Vsupply of 3V and series resistor of 100 ohm (98.6 actually): VLED=2.418V to 2.84V, Imax=6.15mA, dim lighting

    With Vsupply of 4.5V and series resistor of 100 ohm (98.6 actually): VLED=2.88V to 3.441V, Imax=15.97mA, fairly good brightness

    With Vsupply of 3V and series resistor of 68 ohm (66.4 actually): VLED=2.510V to 2.872V, Imax=7.66mA, fairly bright

    With Vsupply of 3V and series resistor of 33 ohm (32.7 actually): VLED=2.672V to 2.935V, Imax=10.94mA, fairly bright

    With Vsupply of 3V and series resistor of 22 ohm (21.8 actually): VLED=2..746V to 2.959V, Imax=12.33mA, fairly bright

    With Vsupply of 3V and no series resistor: VLED =3V, Imax=17.88mA, bright lighting

    With Vsupply of 4.5V and no series resistor: VLED=4.5V, Imax=76.5mA, very bright, Exceeds 225mW of power!!!

    Additionally I asked the company that created the LED they mentioned that 3V directly to LED is ok but not 4.5V. Also 2V directly to LED is not recommended.

    I recommend using some series resistor to keep LED current in control and establish desired brightness.

  • I know typical LEDs usually require a some current limiting resistor to prevent LED burnout, but based on the LED datasheet, the application circuit shows a battery connected directly to the LED without a series resistor. So I ask: Would this type of LED be able to handle a 3V (or possibly 4.5V ) directly without current limiting resistor? Or should I add a 68 ohm (or 150 ohm for 4.5V case) resistor in series? Thanks.

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