ChrisWalker

Member Since: August 12, 2010

Country: United States

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Member145423,
    Please drop by the Netduino community forums and we’ll be happy to help you debug your Netduino app. Breakpoints should just work, as long as you’re debugging the same code which is running on your Netduino.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Member237054,
    You can use any of the digital or analog+digital pins on Netduino as chip select. That gives you at least 17 devices you can control on a SPI bus.
    Chris

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Richie F.
    You should be able to use TCP or UDP sockets with Netduino Plus without any troubles. Please post your experience over on the Netduino community forums so we understand what’s going on…and we’ll be happy to help get you up and running.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10107 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Member190691,
    The multitasking “thread quantum” is 20ms in .NET MF (although you can set this to a lower number in the source if you’d like). But that only applies if you have threads running in your app which are not asleep and the managed code thread switcher needs to give other threads some time.
    The interrupts are fired as events, but those events should be able to activate in microseconds (based on what your app is doing); they are also all timestamped (which is helpful in the case that many interrupts are queued).
    One more option…if you want interrupts that fire on the nanosecond scale using native code interop, you can use an IRQ or FIQ in hardware…and get the kind of performance needed for projects like quadcopters.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    I believe that SparkFun is fulfilling backorders right now. We’re working to get enough units to SparkFun so that they have extras for sale.
    The shortages are in part a result of SparkFun’s awesome customers (aka unexpected rush on Netduino Pluses) Which we really appreciate!
    Thank you very much for your patience; we’ll get the backorders cleared up soon.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Audiobuzz,
    Exactly…that note is a relic from pre-open-source days. .NET Micro Framework is free and open source (Apache 2.0/BSD license) as of fall 2009.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi rodrigoi,
    If you need a Netduino with Ethernet and/or SD in the meantime, you can pick up a regular Netduino and an Arduino Ethernet shield. You won’t get the fast Ethernet speed of the Netduino Plus, but it should work well–and you’ll get the same high-shield-compatibility, larger RAM, and open source firmware like Netduino Plus.
    NOTE: you’ll want to solder on a 6-pin ICSP header if using a late-2010 or newer Arduino Ethernet shield.
    SparkFun should have the “regular” Netduinos in stock early next week.
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    Hi Nadeem,
    That’s a pretty common misunderstanding. There are actually a number of different ways to program Netduinos using open-source operating systems and development tools. Today.
    Firstmost, the Mono team’s newest open-source compiler will build standards-based C# code for Netduino [thanks, Miguel and team!]. Brian Jepson posted makefile instructions on the Mono forum (at forums.netduino.com). And open source developers are currently adding .NET MF support to MonoDevelop…for those who like feature-rich IDEs that are cross-platform and open source.
    Also, you can erase your Netduino and program native C/C++ code using your favorite code editor, GCC, and Atmel SAM-BA on Windows/Linux. You can even run FreeRTOS on the boards.
    Thanks for your enthusiasm about open source. We appreciate it!
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

  • Product DEV-10107 | about 3 years ago

    ThiSel: Netduino Plus just arrived at SparkFun.
    http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10186

  • Product DEV-10186 | about 3 years ago

    .NET Micro Framework takes about 300KB. The bootloader takes about 40KB. lwIP takes about 64KB. And there’s about 24-40KB of extra space (in addition to the 64KB) which is reserved for future expansion.
    If you want to get rid of the bootloader, you can. If you want to get rid of the reserved space, you can. If you want to load FreeRTOS on the board or write native C/C++ code you can do that too :)
    Chris
    Secret Labs LLC

No public wish lists :(