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Mr Electrical

Member Since: September 18, 2010

Country: United States

Profile

Bio

I am an electrical engineer and work for one of the top US companies that automates breweries, beverage companies, pharmaceutical companies, and nearly all food manufacturers. I am constantly making SOMETHING, be it a Roomba with machine vision, designing custom EMG software and hardware, or developing on my Raspberry Pis and Beaglebones.

Organizations

IEEE

Spoken Languages

English, some Spanish, some German

Programming Languages

C, C++, C#, Perl, Python, Visual Basic, Assembly Code, Wiring, Processing, Java

Universities

Colorado State University

Expertise

Embedded systems and firmware, machine vision, product design, steel fabrication, industrial robotics, industrial automation

Interests

Electronics, piano, stringed instruments, physics, knitting, tarantulas

  • Here’s the fun thing: no one is forcing you to read the blog ;)

    Also, nothing in the blog post said anything about you being threatened with the label of “hater” or was trying to “disengenuously educate” you. It was an inclusive article that listed resources. That was it.

  • ^^And this is why I love your company. I’ve met you, your wife, and nearly all your staff and I have to say that all of them are wonderful.

  • 1) You are wrong: https://blog.adafruit.com/2016/06/26/a-neopixel-necklace-to-celebrate-lgbt-pride-her_nerdiness-pride2016/

    2) If you’ve actually been watching Adafruit, the only new, exclusive products are the Feather line which are arduino clones which they have been making for years, just a different form factor. And if you want to get nitty gritty, a lot of those feather shields are charlieplexed LED shields based off of an attachment Shawn Hymel made for his Badgerboard that given away at Makerfaires and maker cons.

  • I understood your comment perfectly. You are wanting to depoliticize electronics. However, the Maker community is inherently political as it reaches to bridge the gap between cold hardware and a warm, vibrant community. Given there ARE LGBT folks in engineering and they ARE alienated, putting out a small blog post about inclusion is a fantastic thing.

  • As an electrical engineer and a gay gentleman, I appreciate this very much. Engineering communities are traditionally very conservative which can make it very lonely at times. I was very surprised and happy to hear about the makerspace in Oakland - I recently moved to California and have been looking for a community with like interests, so this is a great place to start.

    Thank you very much for the post. Just another reason I love Sparkfun and will support them the best I can :)

  • Sparkfun is advocating the inclusion of all communities and making resources known to underserved communities, not making a specific moral stand. By showing support for the LGBT community, they can only be serving their demographic. Your counter examples are erroneous as well - until Sparkfun shows you how reanimate a fetus with an Arduino, create an automated illegal immigrant detector, or how to stop bullets Magneto style, they will remain irrelevant to engineering and the Maker community.

    By the way, if you are going to hate on Sparkfun for this, go hate on Adafruit as well - they are VERY outspoken about LGBT issues and change their logo to a rainbow theme every June in support of LGBT month.

  • Oh shove it. Sparkfun’s job in the community is to bring people together over tech and education. The beauty of open source hardware and software is that it allows people from all walks of life to come together to make something great. By serving and including all communities, you only make the maker community stronger.

  • I’m making $70k/year fresh out of college designing and programming industrial control systems for the world’s largest manufacturing facilities and chemical plants. I basically live on the set of How Its Made and Modern Marvels. In a nutshell, my life is 100x cooler than some a55h073 writing spam crawlers in his parent’s basement surrounded mold and infinite sadness.

  • Something that I feel is being forgotten is that all of these are running different flavors of Linux with different overheads. As such, the amount of time the processor is dedicating to each benchmark is going to be vastly different.

    For example, the Edison is running Yocto Linux which is a very minimalist version of Linux. In fact, it is so minimalist that it is very difficult to install any packages or other softwares on it - they assume you will build a new version of Yocto with any packages you need when you need them. It has very few background processes and as a result has a much greater amount of CPU time it can dedicate to running your benchmark code.

    Conversely, if we look at the Raspi, it is running a comparatively heavy version of Linux (Raspian in this case). Instead of a super bare-bones experience like Yocto, Raspian is designed to be almost kid-friendly. There is A LOT happening in the background to give you endless tools, super easy USB interfaces (keyboards, mice, wifi/bluetooth dongles, ect), a GUI with two video outputs, external RAM, and endless other things. The end result is that the Raspi has a much greater CPU overhead and much less CPU time it can dedicate to a given test.

    When you compare the two without taking this into consideration, it looks like the Edison is the best thing since sliced bread. But, I’d bet you money if you built a version of Yocto for the Raspi (and the other two boards) and ran your tests again, you’d see something completely different. I very highly doubt 400MHz dual core chip can run around 3.5-4 times faster than a 1.5MHz quad core chip (especially in both single and multicore tests). Intel does some great work, don’t get me wrong, but so do the folks that design the ARM architectures.

    You also have to look at the fact that PHP is an interpreted language and not a compiled one. Different instruction sets and chip architectures are going to define just how well a bit of scripted code will run depending on its ability to do things like pipelining, prefetching instructions, and the like. I would personally love to see some benchmarks done in compiled languages like C/C++ and see how they compare to the PHP benchmarks.

  • Something that I feel is being forgotten is that all of these are running different flavors of Linux with different overheads. As such, the amount of time the processor is dedicating to each benchmark is going to be vastly different.

    For example, the Edison is running Yocto Linux which is a very minimalist version of Linux. In fact, the reason it is so minimalist that it is very difficult to install any packages or other softwares on it - they assume you will build a new version of Yocto with any packages you need when you need them. It has very few background processes and as a result has a much greater amount of CPU time it can dedicate to running your benchmark code.

    Conversely, if we look at the Raspi, it is running a comparatively heavy version of Linux (Raspian in this case). Instead of a super bare-bones experience like Yocto, Raspian is designed to be almost kid-friendly. There is A LOT happening in the background to give you endless tools, super easy USB interfaces (keyboards, mice, wifi/bluetooth dongles, ect), a GUI with two video outputs, external RAM, and endless other things. The end result is that the Raspi has a much greater CPU overhead and much less CPU time it can dedicate to a given test.

    When you compare the two without taking this into consideration, it looks like the Edison is the best thing since sliced bread. But, I’d bet you money if you built a version of Yocto for the Raspi (and the other two boards) and ran your tests again, you’d see something completely different. I very highly doubt 400MHz dual core chip can run around 3.5-4 times faster than a 1.5MHz quad core chip (especially in both single and multicore tests). Intel does some great work, don’t get me wrong, but so do the folks that design the ARM architectures.

    You also have to look at the fact that PHP is an interpreted language and not a compiled one. Different instruction sets and chip architectures are going to define just how well a bit of scripted code will run depending on its ability to do things like pipelining, prefetching instructions, and the like. I would personally love to see some benchmarks done in compiled languages like C/C++ and see how they compare to the PHP benchmarks.

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