Sgt_Lemming

Member Since: January 11, 2012

Country: United States

  • Product WRL-11924 | about 2 weeks ago

    Can you please export this again, I’d really like use this schematic as a reference for a design, and the missing two pages are kind of important.

  • Product CAB-12016 | about 6 months ago

    Under USB 2.0, that’s just not possible. 500mA is the most any USB device is allowed to draw from the bus, >so the total of all devices powered by a bus-powered hub has to be less than 500mA, or the host will shut >down one or more of the devices.

    That is providing the hub follows the spec to the letter, which a lot of them don’t.

  • Product CAB-12016 | about 7 months ago

    Can you please check if the hub chip is restricting current? I.e. my desktop PC has 2A rated USB ports, and plugged directly into them my devices charge a lot faster, will this hub restrict the current to 500mA or does it just allow whatever the upstream host can provide?

  • Product CAB-12016 | about 7 months ago

    a USB 3.0 host port should still provide more power to a USB 2.0 device, so yes it should work… unless they have restricted the current in the hub chip.

    Edit: To clarify this a bit, the extra pins in USB 3.0 connectors are pretty much all for data, the power pins are all common.

  • Product SEN-11183 | about 2 years ago

    Most modern laptops don’t have RS-232 ports, so that’s kind of a moot point.

    Whether or not the serial port accepts those levels is another question, and probably stems more from people watering down the spec by doing crap like this.

    I’m not saying it 100% won’t work, but referring to it as RS-232 versus TTL will just confuse the issue, and also leads to the possibility of damaging the device.

  • Product SEN-11196 | about 2 years ago

    Sorry, but no it’s not.

    TTL == Transistor to Transistor Logic

    RS-232 == A standard defined by the Electronic Industries Association for the signalling and voltage levels of serial communications.

    All serial communications are not RS-232.

  • Product SEN-11193 | about 2 years ago

    Guys, 0 – VCC is not a valid RS-232 serial level. If you connected this to a proper RS-232 port, it would not work. Please correct this in the spec as it is misleading and some people would take it to mean you can connect it to a PC or something similar directly.

    RS-232 specifies that the voltage must swing between a negative voltage and a positive voltage to represent logical 0’s and 1’s. The minimum swing normally accepted for this is from -5V to +5v with anything in between being ignored (i.e. 0V).

  • Product SEN-11196 | about 2 years ago

    Guys, 0 – VCC is not a valid RS-232 serial level. If you connected this to a proper RS-232 port, it would not work. Please correct this in the spec as it is misleading and some people would take it to mean you can connect it to a PC or something similar directly.

    RS-232 specifies that the voltage must swing between a negative voltage and a positive voltage to represent logical 0’s and 1’s. The minimum swing normally accepted for this is from -5V to +5v with anything in between being ignored (i.e. 0V).

  • Product SEN-11195 | about 2 years ago

    Guys, 0 – VCC is not a valid RS-232 serial level. If you connected this to a proper RS-232 port, it would not work. Please correct this in the spec as it is misleading and some people would take it to mean you can connect it to a PC or something similar directly.

    RS-232 specifies that the voltage must swing between a negative voltage and a positive voltage to represent logical 0’s and 1’s. The minimum swing normally accepted for this is from -5V to +5v with anything in between being ignored (i.e. 0V).

  • Product SEN-11183 | about 2 years ago

    Guys, 0 - VCC is not a valid RS-232 serial level. If you connected this to a proper RS-232 port, it would not work. Please correct this in the spec as it is misleading and some people would take it to mean you can connect it to a PC or something similar directly.

    RS-232 specifies that the voltage must swing between a negative voltage and a positive voltage to represent logical 0’s and 1’s. The minimum swing normally accepted for this is from -5V to +5v with anything in between being ignored (i.e. 0V).

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