PEJ02

Member Since: January 22, 2012

Country: United States

  • News - So You Want to Learn FPGA… | about 10 months ago

    I bought a DLP-FPGA USB Xilinx 3E-based FPGA Module with a very nice instruction manual from DLP Design and followed their tutorials. Worked for me. The folks at DLP were very good in answering all the questions I had. The board is fitted with an FTDI part with 2 logical USB ports which means that you can create some VHDL (I’ve never tried Verilog) to send logged data back to a host PC and also program the FPGA via a single USB cable. I also used the high speed version of the board which is fitted with 32Mbytes SDRAM. Learning how to create a memory controller block using the Xilinx ISE wizard took a lot of time but was well worth it. I eventually used the module, with the SDRAM acting as a frame buffer, in a battery-powered design to control the backplane of a custom-built LCD.

    FPGAs are very different beasts to the MCU’s on Arduino’s and require a whole different mindset before you can start getting to grips with them. They are definitely not suitable for “whack-it-in” engineering prototype tasks like the Arduino is.

  • Product DEV-11712 | about a year ago

    If you want a small embedded Linux board running a Cortex A8 designed by a small team of engineers then the 17 x 58 mm Gumstix Overo boards are hard to beat. There is also a dual-core A9 version (requires a heatsink) too. Sure, they cost more than an Allwinner-powered pcDuino but if you want a small, well-supported and well-documented, board to build your design around these are hard to beat. There is also a Gumstix-like board here.

  • Product DEV-11712 | about a year ago

    The Olimex folks have an A10S-powered board with LOTS (116 supposedly) of I/O here. Price is likely to be around $65 according to the Mouser website. Could be a good alternative?

  • Product WRL-11395 | about 2 years ago

    Compare and contrast with the mbed…

  • Tutorial - A ProMicro Installation and Arduino Briefing | about 2 years ago

    Anyone got this working with Win7x64? First time round, it enumerated on USB as a SparkFun ProMicro and installed the .inf file. I then edited the boards.txt file to include leonardo and then launched arduino 1.0. It came up as a Leonardo board on COM4 so I created a blinky sketch for it and uploaded the code to the ProMicro. All seemed ok except when it re-enumerated on the USB, this time as an Arduino Leoardo on the Device Manager. When I point it at the previous .inf driver file it complains that it cannot find suitable driver software.

    From what I can see under Properties for this USB device, the VID and PID values are different (2341/0034) to what is listed in the .inf file.

  • Tutorial - A ProMicro Installation and Arduino Briefing | about 2 years ago

    Anyone got this working with Win7x64? First time round, it enumerated on USB as a SparkFun ProMicro and installed the .inf file. I then edited the boards.txt file to include leonardo and then launched arduino 1.0. It came up as a Leonardo board on COM4 so I created a blinky sketch for it and uploaded the code to the ProMicro. All seemed ok except when it re-enumerated on the USB, this time as an Arduino Leoardo on the Device Manager. When I point it at the previous .inf driver file it complains that it cannot find suitable driver software.

    From what I can see under Properties for this USB device, the VID and PID values are different (2341/0034) to what is listed in the .inf file.

  • Product DEV-10998 | about 2 years ago

    So the overhead associated with not using an FTDI 232RL used on the Arduino Nano and having dedicated USB CDC device code in flash is around 3.3 kByte? Is there any way of removing the HID code that many people won’t need? Also, how much on-chip RAM is used by the USB CDC & HID code?

No public wish lists :(