epicycloid

Member Since: January 24, 2012

Country: United States

  • On Makerspaces: Like the majority here, I don't use any Makerspaces. As has been implied, I have better equipment at home, that I'm used to, that hasn't been mucked with since the last time I left the bench. If I only have an hour or so a night, and then have to come back, a shared Makerspace isn't going to remain undisturbed 'til the next visit. And no, packing my project, mid-assembly into a project box to carry home and back, isn't my idea of fun either. When I have gone to Makerspaces (or events) I find I'm not learning as much as sharing what I know, hence if I'm focused on a project (of my own) it is less conducive / productive in a shared environment. And along the millennial joke line here, I can't concentrate on nitty-gritty details in a noisy environment like so many younger folks seem to be able to do these days.

    On Sharing: So many projects are so narrow in focus, that other than sharing code on GitHub, or similar, a lot of projects just don't seem to have overlap enough to share. I do a lot with stepper motors, and each project seems very unique. So sharing happens more on narrowly focused forums than in wide open public spaces, so to speak.

    On Gender: Engineers and programmers are generally "problem solvers." Give them a problem and they go tackle it. But in order to attract youth and cross gender boundaries, it is more important to find things that generate interest, and the interest grows into a desire to do the next thing. Learn more, do more, step-by-step. A good example is the number of females that got hooked on fashion-extending sew-in boards (think LilyPad and about that other company that makes a lot of blue PCB's). While that's not my interest, it certainly crosses the gender boundaries more successfully than yet another 9 DOF sensor, or parts for more BattleBots / Killer Robots (I think I can safely say those generally attract males ;-).

No public wish lists :(