nakedhoof

Member Since: January 28, 2012

Country: United States

  • News - IP Obesity | about 2 years ago

    Get back to us after you’ve gone through the process of inventing something unique, then having your cajones cut off while someone else profits from your work. Let us know how you feel about it then. Until then, you have no idea what you’re talking about, and neither does Don Lancaster.

  • News - IP Obesity | about 2 years ago

    Almost all great inventions are the product of a single person. Less so nowadays, only because exceptional people have been pushed out of mainstream society, or forced into an uncomfortable box because everyone is special.

    That doesn’t mean that you can’t have fun with stuff.

  • News - IP Obesity | about 2 years ago

    I’m pretty sure that most or none of those 431 products would qualify for a patent. The rules are pretty strict as to what qualifies.

  • News - New Product Friday: Some … | about 2 years ago

    It’s the beard, isn’t it?

  • News - New Product Friday: Some … | about 2 years ago

    That beard is frightening….

  • News - On Radios, Summits and Sa… | about 2 years ago

    No snow…hmm

  • News - On Radios, Summits and Sa… | about 2 years ago

    There are plenty of faster and more powerful choices, including ones from Atmel, TI, Zilog, Microchip, Freescale, etc.

    What you might not get is the mountains of amateur and/or professional level code written specifically for them and any number of peripheral products. Every single one of these manufacturers, however, provide professional level tools to support their products, and also provide free engineering and technical support to all comers. Remember: assembly code isn’t really that difficult. Once you develop a mindset for breaking larger tasks down into smaller components, you might even find it preferable to using a compiled language, such as C and it’s variants. If you become skilled in using assembler, you’ll also be blessed with a faster workflow, and extremely fast and tight code.

  • News - According to Pete - Augus… | about 2 years ago

    I believe that the SynthAxe, played and toured extensively by Alan Holdsworth, used an optical system to trigger the untuned strings of the SynthAxe. This would then trigger a synthesizer designed specifically for this purpose. The advantages of optical triggering were that it was nearly instantaneous, as opposed to analog magnetic triggering which suffers from significant lag to this day in other guitar-triggered synths, mostly manufactured by Roland in Japan.

  • News - According to Pete - Augus… | about 2 years ago

    It’s a Jackson Randy Rhoads model. Randy Rhoads, R.I.P. It’s made for heavy rock, as Randy Rhoads played with Ozzie Osbourne until his untimely death in a plane crash.

  • News - SparkFun Gets Social | about 2 years ago

    Ignorance is bliss.

No public wish lists :(