OldFar-SeeingArt

Member Since: January 8, 2008

Country: United States

  • Totally dig the flying buttresses!

  • The Particle Photon looks like the ideal product to solve a problem I am currently fighting. What I would use the Photon system for is tracking the whereabouts of certain individuals that have been lost - or will have been lost in the near future since the ones lost in the recent past would not, of course, have a Photon tracker with them, where ever they are. (It’s really their fault that they became lost before we thought of using the Photon…not ours.) The concept is still a bit hazy but the plan sounds decent enough once you’ve had a drink or two. The Wifi portion would be the trick here - it would help us determine the location of said lost persons by telling us where they weren’t. Then the calculation is simple and straight forward - subtract the locations where they aren’t from the locations where they could be and pretty soon, you will have the location where they must be.

    In my super secret hidden laboratory lies the worlds first teleportation contraption. And unlike all other similar devices, this one teleports the user from here to the Unseen Universities Laboratory of Incredible Minutiae. Early attempts using the device resulted in users disappearing from this realm and re-appearing in, er, uh, well, we don’t exactly know where they went. But we are fairly sure that if we could track them with some sort of device, we can work out the problems in no time as opposed to some large amount yes time. It is believed that the professors at the Unseen Universities Laboratory of Incredible Minutiae likely enough know the answer to this perplexing problem and will part with it if simply given enough beer.

    The particular shield that would solve my problems would be the SparkFun Photon Wearable Shield. We would sew one of these into the garments of the soon-to-be-lost person BEFORE they are lost. (We tried sewing tracking devices into their towels but they seem to continually lose them after consuming one too many Pan Galactic Gargle Blasters) Then when they inevitably become lost by not being found, the OLED could display a message to them informing them that they are, indeed, irretrievably lost and should probably never have consented to testing the teleporter to begin with. Of course, that’s why we have such an enormous EULA for them to cover events just like this one described above. We also believe that we are simply out their jurisdiction, should said lost persons attempt to find a legal remedy. The realm wherein lies Ankh-Morpork has no extradition treaty with any entity in this realm. QED, ipso lo facto, we claim the right of hey nonny nonny and a hot cha cha. To wit, ollie ollie oxen free and no tap backs.

    For further information, please re-read the above.

  • Once again, there are two kinds of people: those who know about these topics and those who don’t. For those people who don’t know about it, this topic may come as a surprise. I was in the ‘don’t know’ crowd up to a few months ago. The first place I read about this topic was Wil Wheaton’s blog. He has had depression and panic attacks for several years and he has written detailed accounts about living with it.

    As he says often - ‘depression lies’. And as usual, knowing what’s up is half the battle in over coming it. Thanks for sharing your demons with us. The more they are brought out into the broad light of day, the easier it becomes to chase them away.

  • Hey, hold my beer and watch this…

  • Can’t resist: “hacker uses hacksaw making hack marks.”

    Very timely post - I brought a Ikea led bulb to work today to dissect it.

    Early cfl bulbs were notorious for either failing very fast and/or burning up, complete with flames. Poor design switcher circuits with low efficiency made ‘em run hot. Also, a major factor was mounting them base-upwards such that the switching ballast ran hotter. I expect the newer led bulbs will go through the same evolution but probably faster since the producers have probably learned from past mistakes.

    Cheap switchers often rely on full voltage sine wave power so triac based dimmers can make them either fail or run hot.

    If someone wants to do some lifetime comparisons, it would be good to note which way the bulbs are mounted or to do two of each - one ‘up’, one ‘down’.

    Great posting, Nate

  • Great job on behalf of the contestants!

    How many entries were there?

  • Once again, no fracking way for me to view this. I and many like me simply cannot stop work during the day to watch a video presentation. Why is there no way to down-load the video?

  • Thank you for the interesting topic. I’ve learned and forgotten much of this over the years. In particular I enjoyed the comments about the generalization of the method that @Blaise Pascal posted.

    Something that caught my eye however was the third paragraph about the utility of integer math on small embedded controllers; this is probably worth an enginursday blog. I wanted to only use floating point when I started out programming PICs but was enlightened by my mentor of how to use integer math instead. After a while it became second nature. When I began to use compilers instead of assembly language, I still applied integer math and still do even though the compiler provided floating point libraries and my simple programs on large PIC32 chips had room and speed for floating point. Nothing religious here, it’s just a way of seeing and solving problems. Horses for courses.

  • It doesn’t always work out like you might think…

    http://www.chillhour.com/hell-in-the-doll-house-ken-does-not-like-barbie

  • Well, the story has gone viral. It’s been on 4 or 5 clearing-house websites. I went back to Amazon to see if the reviews have change any — they have; the page has been taken down. Going to the publisher site, there is an apology and a statement that they are going to re-write the book.

No public wish lists :(