Member #367806

Member Since: October 8, 2012

Country: United States

  • Sort of the opposite of member #114323’s comment - I noticed this is about 1/10 the price of the Parallax PING Ultrasonic sensor which I usually see retail for around $30 (e.g. Jameco Electronics p/n 282861). Does Parallax just have an insane markup, or is there some quality/accuracy difference that explains the huge price gap?

  • That actually helps a lot - thanks!

  • “this type of post on a business website that should be neutral regarding things unrelated to its business.”

    so I assume you don’t shop at Target either?

    and also don’t support the other 379 companies that took a political stance by filing a friend-of-the-court brief with the Supreme Court on gay marriage?

    I understand that, as an electronics hobbyist, you probably don’t read Target or American Airline’s corporate blogs that much…just a heads up that, if this is your position, you have way more companies to be angry with than just SparkFun.

  • Hi Nick - terminology question, especially since you mentioned at the very beginning that this is evolving and may change in the future. The most common acronym I’m used to seeing is “LGBT.” I tried Googling some of this and couldn’t find clear answers, so I figure here is as good a place to ask as any since you seem up to date on the topic. So:

    • What exactly is the definition of “queer”? Is it sort of an “any of the above” umbrella term? Or does it have a specific meaning? e.g. can you be gay and not queer, or vice versa?
    • What’s the “+” at the end? Is that to cover things that might not have a letter in the acronym? (asexual, pansexual, etc)
    • Why the * after trans* when you use it in writing? I was expecting a footnote at the bottom but didn’t see one.
    • I noticed that the Harvard website has the letters switched around - BGLTQ. Any reason you’re aware of for that?
  • I checked with tech support and they said they usually use their heat gun at 212F with this stuff. I also stuck it in my oven at 215F and then 250F because I got impatient and that worked as well (better than using a hair dryer when I needed to do a whole bunch of parts).

  • For the curious - these motors are great but they have very tiny, flexible leads that don’t work well with a regular breadboard. I needed to solder solid-core jumper wires onto them to make a bunch of these robots, and wanted to use heat-shrink tubing to cover up the solder connections. I don’t have a heat gun, and using a hair dryer with just one of these tiny motors is a pain (they’re so light that they blow around) - let alone two dozen of them.

    Solution? Stick them in the oven! I checked with tech support and they said a different carrier had a data sheet with a maximum recommended storage temp of 70C/150F. The problem - the temp for the heat shrink tubing is 212F. The question - will that destroy the motor? Answer - as far as I found, no. I stuck one in the oven with heat shrink tubing at 200F, then got impatient because the tubing didn’t seem to be shrinking enough and tried 215F. Checked the motor afterwards and it still worked fine. Then I got really brave and tried 250F to shrink the tubing a little more, and the motor STILL worked. Of course the caveat is that I didn’t do a long-term test, so I’m not sure if this will affect the lifetime of the motor, but at least it didn’t destroy it right away.

No public wish lists :(