Member Since: July 12, 2008

Country: United States




Spoken Languages


Programming Languages

C, Ada, IDL, Fortran, Assembly


University of Arizona

  • Shoot! I knew that Moore’s Law couldn’t go on forever. Now it has shrunk US! What am I supposed to do with this MEGA ATMega?

    What are you complaining about? Now you can actually see the bits inside the chip, programming it should be a snap. What about ME? If the Hershey’s kiss is this huge, I am terrified of WHAT COMES NEXT!

  • This looks like a nice jump into robotic arms. However, I would have liked it to mount the heavy, metal geared servo to the ‘C’ tilt bracket rather than on the wrist side an decreased the weight on the wrist considerably, and also decrease the torque on shoulder or elbow joints. It would also leave room for a wrist rotate motor or servo. Of course, with rotate in-line you really should use an axle shaft with bearing supports at both ends before attaching to the servo, and a thrust bearing wouldn’t hurt. That way you can simulate all the motions of a human wrist, the flexing, and the rotation. If you used the ‘pan’ mount point for a servo to give the wrist a rotate function, you would have a lot of force hanging off the servo output gear, unless you added essentially a ‘lazy susan’ ring bearing to take all the side loads and let the pan servo do just rotate. The bolt patterns on the output end look like you could mount a wrist rotate there between this tilt-pan and the claw, but that would REALLY put a lot of weight towards the tip.

  • Actually, I have been looking for a long time for a switch cover like this! Unfortunately, I bet that it is too small for my purpose. I have been looking for one that can be attached to a house hold light switch cover to put over the disposal on switch so that I won’t accidentally turn it on when I am reaching over to turn on the overhead light switch which is right next to it. I should reverse them because I would expect the safe one would be closest to hand when standing in front of the sink, but whom ever installed it put the dangerous one closest and easiest to use! I thought that a missile launch switch cover would not only solve the problem no matter which position the dangerous one is in, plus

    it would look REALLY NEAT!

  • PSmith, I am with Wayne. I want to design a board that uses and ATMega, or maybe the Arduino Mega, and either a 3 axis accelerometer and 3 axis gyro or the 9DOF Razor IMU breakout board with on board ATMega32, a barometric pressure gauge, GPS module, microSD card for data storage, USB plug to connect to a computer to download all the data, probably 3 or 4 high current FETs to fire pyros to release parachutes, etc, 4 servo ports to control fins, and maybe a pluing daughter card with a HAM radio license required telemetry system.

    But it sounds like the software to load on the 9DOF Razor to due true 3D inertial nav is not out there yet, if all they have is attitude and direction software. Also, we need a very high bandwidth between the rate gyros and the servos controlling the fins to help keep the rocket stable, or at least always pointing straight up until the motor quits and the speed falls off. With just the sensors you have for sale on this website, we can already make this super-duper Rocketduino in a very small package and run off of very little battery power. I have not yet started getting high power certified, by I am looking to go L3 with hybrid rockets and go for max altitude. As soon as I finish a hundred other projects, too :)

  • I have enjoyed the upgrade to the TOL-00084, but while using it on my underwater robot, it fell off and hit tip first. It seems to have damaged the cable where the tips slide in. Where can I buy a replacement cable? It looks from the images above that the cable should be easy to replace.

  • I would love to see one of these babies running a RepRap machine. The ability to store multiple build files on an SD card, download all the files over USB, then use a serial interface display to control which parts to print!

  • The Atmel recommends 12-22pF capacitors for their ATMega and ATtiny microcontrollers. So 22pF sounds like a good number.

No public wish lists :(