Member #47110

Member Since: September 4, 2008

Country: United States

  • Product CAB-12613 | about 5 months ago

    You have to open the case, find the place where the wire from the pin 18 of the HDMI connector is attached. That wire carries +5V and is used to power the DAC inside the converter. Unfortunately that pin can’t provide enough current because it is meant to power only a small I2C EEPROM in the monitor that is used for DDC, not a DAC and potentially some extra circuitry. You cut that wire and feed in an external power at that point, one of those ubiquitous USB chargers will do the job fine. The precise mod varies for each of these adapters, there are several types around on eBay and DealExtreme.

  • Product CAB-12613 | about 5 months ago

    What about the power requirements for the HDMI->VGA converter? How much current does it try to source from the HDMI port? The power pins on HDMI are meant to supply only some I2C EEPROMs for DDC monitor identification, so they often cannot provide much current.

    E.g. Raspberry Pi can source only few milliamps tops and most such converters either simply don’t work with it or can even fry it. I had to hack a similar adapter to add external power to it to use it with the Raspberry Pi.

  • News - New Product Friday: Don't… | about 5 months ago

    What about the power requirements for the HDMI->VGA converter? How much current does it try to source from the HDMI port? The power pins on HDMI are meant to supply only some I2C EEPROMs for DDC monitor identification, so they often cannot provide much current.

    E.g. Raspberry Pi can source only few milliamps tops and most such converters either simply don’t work with it or can even fry it. I had to hack mine to add external power to it to use it with the Raspberry Pi.

  • News - New Product Friday: OLED … | about 6 months ago

    Robert, you should either hire a sound engineer or learn how to mix the music properly. When doing the end of the clip, you are still talking and the music is louder than your voice. It is distracting and makes you hard to understand. The effect is that there is music and someone is making weird noises in the background.

    The proper way to do this is to start the music low, you talk over it and only when you are done you fade it in fully. This requires a bit of preparation and practice from the speaker (and also an in-ear monitor), so that you finish speaking “on the beat”, but the result is much better. If you are doing it by post-processing on a PC, then just be careful about the levels and proper fading, the timing can be adjusted easily.

  • Product TOL-11784 | about 8 months ago

    Anyone knows about an EU distributor carrying this? I could use one of these, but the shipping from US to France is crazy :(

  • News - So You Want to Learn FPGA… | about 10 months ago

    I am a software engineer, with a master in CS. I am dabbling in electronics as a hobby.

    Understanding the “non-procedural” part of programming FPGAs is not all that tricky - if you have used languages such as Haskell or Prolog and encountered declarative programming during the computer science education, you would be right at home with Verilog or VHDL. Unfortunately a lot of software engineers didn’t have these things at the university, not to mention people who learn a bit of Javascript or PHP and think themselves programmers …

    I think the worst thing someone can do trying to teach/learn programmable logic to software people is to: a) say it is programming b) say that Verilog is similar to C

    Neither is true in the way software engineers understand these terms and it sets the stage up for a major problem with due to not speaking the same language.

    It is similar thing like programmable voltage references - it took me a while to realize that “programming” them actually means soldering one or two resistors! Software engineer thinks programming = source code/compilers/execution flow and the confusion happens right there before even getting to the substance of the discussion.

    Jan

  • News - Engineer Thursday - An In… | last year

    I think you aren’t the target group for the toolkit. Use the IDE, by all means.

    On the other hand, the command line tools are extremely useful when you actually want to automate something - such as rebuilding of the project for several different types of boards your have in production, each may need different settings, etc. With an IDE that is an extremely tedious and error-prone process. Using a short script that calls these tools you can automate all of the above, minimizing the errors and manual work required.

    And re recompiling - the need to recompile to program the target is perhaps not a big deal when writing code for an Arduino, where a typical sketch has few hundreds of lines tops. Try that for an ARM project sometime - even a simple “hello world!” type project needs several files, lots of settings, some libraries linked in, correct linker script etc. Also the code size tends to be a lot bigger, because those chips have a lot more memory and can handle much more than the puny ATMegas. The constant recompilation would be a major waste of time and pain in the neck in such case - that’s why scripts, Makefiles (CMake/Jam/SCons/…) were invented.

    Don’t pan stuff only because you don’t need it/don’t understand its purpose.

    Jan

  • News - Free Day 2012 is Under Wa… | about 2 years ago

    Folks, I would take the sluggish quiz anytime. Or just make it a lottery. This captcha solving is ridiculous, especially considering how unreadable many of them are. This isn’t really worth the effort.

No public wish lists :(