ErikP

Member Since: January 30, 2009

Country: United States

Profile

Role

Digital Design Lab instructor

Organizations

University of Oklahoma

Spoken Languages

English

Programming Languages

C, Pascal, BASIC, assembly for many architectures

Universities

University of Oklahoma, BS & MS

Expertise

Digital hardware, firmware

Interests

Autonomous robots, obsolete computers

  • The hookup guide is a little confusing when discussing enabling the AVRCP buttons. It says that “When you type D to see the basic settings, you’ll notice a line that says ExtFeatures=05” and then shows a table with the descriptions of bits 0, 1, and 2. Then it says “Notice that bit 0 is the bit we need to enable to activate the AVRCP button functionality. Send the command S%,07(/r) to enable this bit while leaving the other two bits enabled.” What’s confusing is that if the original value is 5, then bits 0 and 2 are already set (AVRCP buttons are enabled and it’s discoverable on start up) and the only bit changing with this command is bit 1, which has nothing to do with AVRCP. The guide’s explanation would make more sense if it started with ExtFeatures=06, or with a little bit of rewording, the factory default of ExtFeatures=00.

  • Yes, these should work with MSOP-8. Since these SMT pads are so long, the width across the IC body is not very critical and so this can handle several different package types as long as the pin pitch is 0.65 mm (or very close)

  • “tinyCyclon”? Galactic domination, pedal-by-pedal :-)

  • The description’s “this miniature breakout board” seems inconsistent with the pictures of just the bare chip.
    Also, you keep using the broken link for Fire Marshall Bill Robot. It’s currently http://www.joustinghill.org/matt/robots/firemarshalbill/

  • Probably the video feed will be here (at least the past classes have):
    http://www.ustream.tv/channel/sparkfun-electronics-classroom

  • Awesome! Now I won’t have to build these by hand every semester.

  • Looks pretty cool, but the frequency range you spec doesn’t quite match the data sheet. The DS1077-133 you have pictured ranges from 133 MHz down to 16.2 kHz, not 8.1 kHz. If you need to go down to 8.1 kHz, the data sheet seems to show that you would need the DS1077-66 version.

No public wish lists :(