Santa Claus Impersonator

Member Since: March 28, 2016

Country: United States

Recently, a team from the St. Vrain Innovation Center assembled its first custom PCB design with the help of SparkFun. This is the story behind their project and their experience.

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Some fun project ideas using the SparkFun 9DoF Razor IMU. We'll touch on how to send data over Bluetooth and how you might start to use the board to rig up your own VR headset.

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How to Install CH340 Drivers

August 6, 2019

How to install CH340 drivers (if you need them) on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Pi Servo pHAT (v2) Hookup Guide

July 11, 2019

This hookup guide will show you how to connect and use the Pi Servo pHAT.

SparkFun gator:soil Hookup Guide

June 13, 2019

The gator:soil is analog soil moisture sensor. This tutorial will get you started using the gator:soil with the micro:bit platform.

SparkFun gator:microphone Hookup Guide

June 13, 2019

The gator:microphone is an I2C sensor for detecting sound with an electret microphone. This tutorial will get you started using the gator:microphone with the micro:bit platform.

SparkFun gator:particle Hookup Guide

June 13, 2019

The gator:particle is an I2C heart-rate monitor and pulse oximeter that can be used as a particle sensor. This tutorial will get you started using the gator:particle with the micro:bit platform.

SparkFun gator:environment Hookup Guide

June 13, 2019

The gator:environment combines two I2C sensors for temperature, humidity, pressure, eCO2, and eTVOC values. This tutorial will get you started using the gator:environment with the micro:bit platform.

SAMD51 Thing Plus Hookup Guide

May 24, 2019

This tutorial covers the basic functionality of the SAMD51 Thing Plus and highlights the features of the new ARM Cortex-M4F development board.

Qwiic 12-Bit ADC Hookup Guide

May 23, 2019

Need to add more analog inputs for your project? Check out the Qwiic 12-bit ADC.

Keyboard Shortcut, Qwiic Keypad

April 25, 2019

A simple project using the Qwiic Keypad and the RedBoard Turbo to create your own custom hotkey-pad.

Qwiic Keypad Hookup Guide

April 25, 2019

If you are tired of taking up GPIO pins, wiring a bunch of pull up resistors, and using firmware that scans the keys taking up valuable processing time... check out the new Qwiic Keypad.

Qwiic Proximity Sensor (VCNL4040) Hookup Guide

February 28, 2019

The SparkFun Qwiic Proximity Sensor is a great, qualitative proximity (up to 20 cm) and light sensor. This hookup guide covers a few examples to retrieve basic sensor readings.

Qwiic Joystick Hookup Guide

February 21, 2019

Looking for an easy way to implement a joystick to your next Arduino or Raspberry Pi project? This hookup guide will walk you through using the Qwiic Joystick with the Arduino IDE on a RedBoard Qwiic and in Python on a Raspberry Pi.

LuMini 8x8 Matrix Hookup Guide

January 24, 2019

The LuMini 8x8 Matrix are the highest resolution LED matrix available.

RedBoard Qwiic Hookup Guide

January 10, 2019

This tutorial covers the basic functionality of the RedBoard Qwiic. This tutorial also covers how to get started blinking an LED and using the Qwiic system.
  • There is a possibility that they could have excluded that cost for users who have their own accessories (maybe?). Then again, to me, the unit price doesn't seem too bad for a combination oscilloscope, signal generator, spectrum analyzer, logic analyzer, and SDR. If you know of a cheaper/better setup that is for the most part "plug and play", let me know (I wouldn't mind having some quality tools at home).

    As a note, the only thing in the accessory pack that seems "kind of proprietary" is the cable for the logic analyzer (the normal jumper wires that we carry don't seem to fit in the slot). Otherwise, everything else seems to be your standard BNC, SMA, and IC hook parts. Also, if you are sourcing accessories, users should use quality/trusted manufacturers/suppliers for anything signal related; otherwise, you risk trying to hunt down for noise issues or degraded signals that are from the cable/connectors (a great duh/smack your head moment).

  • In my opinion, the entry/mid-level benchtop tools are the primary value (the oscilloscope, signal generator, and spectrum analyzer) in addition to the SDR. If you already have these tools, then this product probably doesn't fit into your needs. That being said, we do offer the HackRF One, Lime SDR, and BladeRF... which are probably what you are looking for if you just need an SDR.

  • I haven't really dived into the forums because the setup and built-in applications were pretty straight forward if you followed the documentation. (If it is not mentioned above, you do need an external power supply.)

    That being said, I saw a lot of issues filed under the RedPitaya Repo. However, when I setup a HamLab... it only used this OpenHPSDR-PowerSDR Repository (optional) if you wanted to use the SDR software and there are no issues listed in this repo. (If I remember correctly, the software is Windows only.)

    For the benchtop tools, the documented instructions are straight forward; especially if have used similar tools before. Additionally, I like that I could access the tools from an IP address without having my computer physically attached to the system. On a WiFi network, I was also able to access the setup from another room/workbench if needed. Not sure there would be a lot of community activity for those.

    A lot of the SDR tutorials are catered towards more advanced users and are generally hardware-specific; you will also need to find proper antennas for each application. In my experience for almost anything SDR related, it requires a bit of "know-how" and a good amount of online research. To that end, users are expecting cut and dry tutorials for SDR applications... if you find a tutorial with specific instructions for your application, I would explicitly recommend using the listed hardware. It isn't always the easiest to adapt with other hardware unless you know what you are doing (that is even outside the scope of our support team).

  • Currently, we do not have that option available. However, I'll put in a request... I think we would be open to offering a soldering kit for those who want an option to use things like stack-able headers.

  • Hi there, it sounds like you are looking for technical assistance. Please use the link in the banner above, to get started with posting a topic in our forums. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

    That being said, as listed in the datasheet, the microcontroller has a 10-bit ADC.

  • (1) My apologies, I thought you meant we sold none of the Teensy boards (from the entire product line) with headers. Unfortunately, we don't control when/if PJRC releases a header version. From past experience, you may just need to wait. Otherwise, if you are in a rush to start developing:

    • The board is compatible with the header kit
    • If you live in an area with a maker/DIY/hacker-space, I am sure you can find a person/kid who would be willing to solder that up for you.

    (2) If you are looking for technical assistance. Please use the link in the banner above, to get started with posting a topic in our forums. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

    That being said, this question might be better suited for PJRC's forums (as they designed and built the Teensy 4.0). Otherwise, here is a link to link to the datasheet for the microprocessor used on the Teensy 4.0 that PJRC lists. There is a note in the datasheet for a 6-bit DAC, but I am not sure if it is implemented on the board in hardware or software (teensyduino).

  • Hi there, it sounds like you are looking for technical assistance. Please use the link in the banner above, to get started with posting a topic in our forums. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

    That being said, this question might be better suited for PJRC's forums (as they designed and built the Teensy 4.0). Otherwise, here is a link to their product page, which lists the pinouts.

  • Hi there, it sounds like you are looking for technical assistance. Please use the link in the banner above, to get started with posting a topic in our forums. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

    Otherwise, here is the datasheet for the sensor. It lists the collector current around 20 mA.

  • Hi there, it sounds like you are looking for technical assistance. Please use the link in the banner above, to get started with posting a topic in our forums. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

    Otherwise, here is the datasheet for the sensor. As listed by the datasheet, the supply current will vary depending on how the sensor is being utilized.

  • I believe I saw them building more... I would check back again just in case or you can also backorder them.

No public wish lists :(