Android and Simon Hacking with Jeff Boody


A few weeks back, SparkFun customer Jeff Boody came to our office to give a presentation about one of his recent projects. Using Bluetooth connectivity, Jeff was able to take one of our SparkFun Simon Kits and link it with his Android-based phone, so that he could use his phones interface to control the Simon board. Essentially, all the game play occurs on the Simon game itself, and the phone simply mirrors the game and transmits the communication back to the board.

Vimeo version can be found here

SparkFun is particularly excited about this project, because it has some awesome implications for the classroom. In the past, using a mobile device or tablet to program a board was difficult, but this could open the door to make that much easier, allowing an educator/teacher to easily program students' boards without using a laptop. With the industry trending towards using tablets/mobile phones more prevalently, this is an awesome development!

If you’re interested in developing a similar app, Jeff has made all his materials available. The Simon app on the Google Play store can be found here, the Simon Says fork can be found here, the Google Play app and the github source for the Serial Mirror can be found here and here, and the Google Play store app and the github source for the BlueSMiRF demo can be found here and here.

Thanks, Jeff, for coming by and teaching us a thing or two.


Comments 16 comments

  • Love hacking this! My hack was to turn it into a four-hole ocarina…

    https://github.com/mrsoltys/Simon-Says/blob/master/Firmware/Ocarina/Ocarina.ino

  • Wondering if the Simon Arduino Code is hosted on the links above somewhere? Seems like its mostly Android stuff?

    Cool App!

  • I think the second paragraph is a bit confusing if you missed the lunch-and-learn talk. Essentially I demonstrated how to turn an Android device into a full Arduino development environment using Linux-on-Android and an app I created called Serial Mirror. The Serial Mirror app was created to support wireless flashing and debugging via a Bluetooth “FTDI” cable. Here is the full presentation if you are interested in the details.

    http://www.jeffboody.net/sparkfun-lunch-and-learn-20130124.pdf

    Jeff

  • Awesome video guys! I hate to point this out, but YET AGAIN this is somehow related to another Harlem Shake video…..Greg, are you up to something? ;-)

    • you’ve most likely just been watching a lot of harlem shake videos. I always get my own product post videos as recommendations when browsing through youtube, even when they have nothing to do with that I’m looking at.

      • I swear I haven’t!! I’ve been watching more video’s from you guys and stuff about different robotics recently!! And the other video that was a “related video” was something about a blue whale!! I don’t watch video’s about animal’s on youtube. Oh well, it’s funny getting random “related” videos :-)

        • I wonder if they’re just the ‘youtube promoted’ videos. or maybe a lot of our customers are REALLY into harlem shake so it thinks you will be too :-)

          • Also, will you guys ever be selling the E-Health kits and such?

            I’m going to use them on a research project this summer and it would be a bit helpful if I didn’t have to buy them from overseas using Euros…..

          • Haha, if that’s the case, then shouldn’t SparkFun make a Harlem Shake video as well? HINT HINT Here’s my crappy logic

            Customers like Harlem Shake. Customers buy from SparkFun. SparkFun + Harlem Shake = double the product sale

            Lol that’s terrible logic but you get my point….maybe make a video promoting new products while doing the Harlem Shake? I don’t know…..how about a poll?

    • Haha sorry I’m innocent. I only put in the appropriate tags. Or did I? …

  • Google’s automatic caption for 21 seconds into the video was: “which allows you to control the introduction chin”, tickled a muscle in me there :)


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