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555 Timer

This is a common 555 timer/oscillator from TI. A classic for all of those first year circuits projects where you need to blink an LED, generate tone, and thousands of other great beginning projects. Google around for a huge list of resources and example projects.

  • 4.5V to 16V supply
  • 8-pin DIP package
  • Timing from microseconds to hours
  • Astable or monostable operation
  • Adjustable duty cycle
  • TTL compatible output
  • Sink or source up to 200mA

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555 Timer Product Help and Resources

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The essential parts for beginning (or even experienced) hobbyists that gives you all of the basic through-hole components you will need to get started playing with embedded projects. We'll identify a few parts in the kit and provide a few basic circuits to get started!

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Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

2 Programming

Skill Level: Rookie - You will need a better fundamental understand of what code is, and how it works. You will be using beginner-level software and development tools like Arduino. You will be dealing directly with code, but numerous examples and libraries are available. Sensors or shields will communicate with serial or TTL.
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Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

3 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Competent - You will be required to reference a datasheet or schematic to know how to use a component. Your knowledge of a datasheet will only require basic features like power requirements, pinouts, or communications type. Also, you may need a power supply that?s greater than 12V or more than 1A worth of current.
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