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Description: This is the 16 LED NeoPixel Ring from Adafruit, a small chainable 1.75" (44.5mm) outer diameter board equipped with 5050 WS2812 RGB LEDs. The WS2812s are each addressable as the driver chip is located inside the LED. Each NeoPixel Stick has ~18mA constant current drive so the color will be very consistent even if the voltage varies, and requires 5V.

Every ring is equipped with a single data line with a very timing-specific protocol requiring a real-time microconroller with a 8MHz or faster processor such as an AVR, Arduino, PIC, mbed, etc. There are solder pads on the back for connecting wires or breadboard pins and two mounting holes for securing this board to many different surfaces.

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Customer Comments

  • Beware! 16-pixel rings are addressed counter-clockwise, while 12- and 24-pixel rings are addressed clockwise! This can make programming the rings of different sizes arrayed together VERY difficult.

  • How sensitive to input voltage are these? I would like to power them from a 6V lantern battery (6.6V unloaded according to my DMM). Will I burn it out? (This seems to be in the unfortunate range of to high for most 5V projects, but too low for a 7805 regulator).

  • What is the inside diameter?

  • How many mm thick are these?

Customer Reviews

4 out of 5

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Sensitive little bugger...

Typical LED RGBs, they are very bright, easily handled with Arduino code, yet are VERY sensitive to voltage limits. Don’t ever go above 5v. It will smoke check fairly quickly. ;) Also, solder from the back side ONLY. The tolerances on the LED side are way too tight. One little extra slip or blob of solder and you’ve shorted them out; apply voltage to it and you’ve destroyed another ring.

I would recommend these things be redesigned using solder PADS on the back-side for the connections instead of through-holes. That way you can’t ever get too much solder leaking through and shorting on the front side.