SparkFun Qwiic HAT for Raspberry Pi

The SparkFun Qwiic HAT for Raspberry Pi is the quickest and easiest way to enter into SparkFun’s Qwiic ecosystem while still using that Raspberry Pi that you’ve come to know and love. The Qwiic HAT connects the I2C bus (GND, 3.3V, SDA and SCL) on your Raspberry Pi to an array of Qwiic connectors on the HAT. Since the Qwiic system allows for daisy chaining boards with different addresses, you can stack as many sensors as you’d like to create a tower of sensing power!

The Qwiic Pi HAT has four Qwiic connect ports, all on the same I2C bus. In addition, many of the useful GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi are broken out. This HAT is compatible with any Raspberry Pi that utilizes the standard 2x20 GPIO header. It has been designed to sit to the side of the Pi, allowing it to work conveniently with a Pi Tin enclosure to connect boards to the Qwiic ports.


The SparkFun Qwiic Connect System is an ecosystem of I2C sensors, actuators, shields and cables that make prototyping faster and less prone to error. All Qwiic-enabled boards use a common 1mm pitch, 4-pin JST connector. This reduces the amount of required PCB space, and polarized connections mean you can’t hook it up wrong.


Get Started with the SparkFun Qwiic Pi HAT Guide

  • 4x Qwiic Connection Ports
  • Select GPIO Pins Broken Out
  • Pi Tin Compatibility

SparkFun Qwiic HAT for Raspberry Pi Product Help and Resources

Qwiic HAT for Raspberry Pi Hookup Guide

November 30, 2017

Get started interfacing your Qwiic enabled boards with your Raspberry Pi. This Qwiic connects the I2C bus (GND, 3.3V, SDA, and SCL) on your Raspberry Pi to an array of Qwiic connectors.

Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
See all skill levels


Customer Comments

  • Sorry but this is not a “HAT”:
    From: https://github.com/raspberrypi/hats “A board can only be called a HAT if:

    It conforms to the basic add-on board requirements It has a valid ID EEPROM (including vendor info, GPIO map and valid device tree information). It has a full size 40W GPIO connector. It follows the HAT mechanical specification It uses a GPIO connector that spaces the HAT between 10mm and 12mm from the Pi (i.e. uses spacers between 10mm and 12mm). If back powering via the GPIO connector the HAT must be able to supply a minimum of 1.3A continuously to the Pi (but ability to supply 2A continuously recommended)."

    No ID EEPROM, size is wrong, no mounting holes.

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet.