SparkFun I2S Audio Breakout - MAX98357A

The SparkFun I2S Audio Breakout board uses the MAX98357A digital to analog converter (DAC), which converts I2S (not be confused with I2C) audio to an analog signal to drive speakers. The I2S Audio Breakout converts the digital audio signals using the I2S standard to an analog signal and amplifies the signal using a class D amplifier which can deliver up to 3.2W of power into a 4Ω load. The board can be configured to output only the left channel audio, right channel, or both.

The SparkFun I2S Audio Breakout board is fairly simple, requiring only a few pin connections to get it up and working. By default the board is configured in “mono” operation, meaning the left and right signals are combined together to drive a single speaker. If you want a separate speaker for the left and right audio channels you’ll need to cut the mono jumper. In addition to being able to select the audio channel output, the gain can also be configured in a few ways. The gain of the amplifier can be configured from as low as +3dB to as high as +15dB. While the channel selection can be configured on board, the gain however is controlled externally using the gain pin. By default, the board is configured for +9dB, but can be easily changed!

Get Started with the SparkFun I2S Audio Breakout Guide

  • Supply Voltage Range: 2.5V - 5.5V.
  • Output Power: 3.2W into 4Ω at 5V.
  • Output Channel Selection: Left, Right, or Left/2 + Right/2 (Default).
  • Sample Rate: 8kHz - 96kHz.
  • Sample Resolution: 16/32 bit.
  • Quiescent Current: 2.4mA.
  • Filterless Class D Outputs
  • No MCLK Required
  • Click and Pop Reduction
  • Short-Circuit and Thermal Protection.

SparkFun I2S Audio Breakout - MAX98357A Product Help and Resources

New!

I2S Audio Breakout Hookup Guide

September 6, 2018

Hookup guide for the MAX98357A I2S audio breakout board.

Alternative Arduino Library

There is an alternative I2C Arduino library to use with SAMD microcontrollers available here and the Arduino Reference Page for that library can be found here.


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2 Electrical Prototyping

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