Raspberry Pi 3 A+

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How does a more compact and more economic Raspberry Pi sound to you? The Raspberry Pi 3 A+ is here and, like the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, it boasts a 64-bit quad core processor running at 1.4GHz, dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless LAN, and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE. The RPi3 A+ is still equipped with the same 64-bit processor as the B+ version but has removed the Ethernet connector and three of the USB ports (leaving you with just one). It still also has the same 2x20 GPIO header and CSI/DSI connectors, making it usable with all of your existing HATs, cameras, and other peripheries. This single-board computer is capable of many of the things your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word processing and playing high-definition video and games. It can run several flavors of Linux and is being used to teach kids all over the world how to program… Oh yeah, and it does all that for about $30.

As mentioned before, the Raspberry Pi 3 A+ features the Broadcom BCM2837, an ARM Cortex-A53 64-bit Quad Core Processor System-on-Chip operating at 1.4GHz, making it both small AND powerful. Since the A+ version only has a single USB port you may want to add more, you can still use a USB hub to provide enough connectivity for a mouse, keyboard, or anything else that you feel the RPi needs. Keep in mind, it is recommended that you use a powered hub so as not to overtax the onboard voltage regulator.

Powering the Raspberry Pi 3 A+ is easy: just plug any 5V/2.5A USB power supply into the microUSB port. There’s no power button, so the RPi will begin to boot as soon as power is applied. To turn it off, simply shut down the Pi 3 A+, then remove power.

On top of all that, the low-level peripherals on the RPi make it great for hardware hacking. The 0.1" spaced 40-pin GPIO header on the RPi gives you access to 27 GPIO, UART, I2C, SPI, as well as 3.3 and 5V sources. Each pin on the GPIO header is identical to its predecessor. If you are planning to run a NOOBS card with the RPi3 A+ make sure that it is up to date with the latest version!

  • Processor: Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 64-bit SoC @ 1.4 GHz
  • Memory: 512MB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • Connectivity: 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz IEE 802.11.b/g/n/ac wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2/BLE
  • Access: Extended 40-pin GPIO header
  • Video & sound: 1 × full size HDMI
    • MIPI DSI display port
    • MIPI CSI camera port
    • 4 pole stereo output and composite video port
  • Multimedia: H.264, MPEG-4 decode (1080p30); H.264 encode (1080p30); OpenGL ES 1.1, 2.0 graphics
  • SD card support: Micro SD format for loading operating system and data storage
  • Input power: 5 V/2.5 A DC via micro USB connector, 5 V DC via GPIO header
  • Production lifetime: The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ will remain in production until at least January 2023

Raspberry Pi 3 A+ Product Help and Resources

Raspberry gPIo

October 29, 2015

How to use either Python or C++ to drive the I/O lines on a Raspberry Pi.

Headless Raspberry Pi Setup

April 23, 2018

Configure a Raspberry Pi without a keyboard, mouse, or monitor.

How to Run a Raspberry Pi Program on Startup

September 18, 2018

In this tutorial, we look at various methods for running a script or program automatically whenever your Raspberry Pi (or other Linux computer) boots up.

How to Use Remote Desktop on the Raspberry Pi with VNC

July 9, 2018

Use RealVNC to connect to your Raspberry Pi to control the graphical desktop remotely across the network.

Python Programming Tutorial: Getting Started with the Raspberry Pi

June 27, 2018

This guide will show you how to write programs on your Raspberry Pi using Python to control hardware.

Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

3 Programming

Skill Level: Competent - The toolchain for programming is a bit more complex and will examples may not be explicitly provided for you. You will be required to have a fundamental knowledge of programming and be required to provide your own code. You may need to modify existing libraries or code to work with your specific hardware. Sensor and hardware interfaces will be SPI or I2C.
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Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
See all skill levels


Customer Comments

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5

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Good size and list of features

Works great. Using to replace a system I built for my grandson. I have plenty of room for a powered USB hub so I don't need the additional connectors