Creative Commons images are CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Retired RETIRED

This product has been retired from our catalog and is no longer for sale.

This page is made available for those looking for datasheets and the simply curious. Please refer to the description to see if a replacement part is available.

Replacement: None. We are no longer selling these RGB strips, but check out the rest of our specialty LEDs! This page is for reference only.

Description: These LED strips contain 30 RGB LEDs per meter. The strips have a self-adhesive backing that you can use to stick the strip to cabinets, enclosures or the dash in your car (probably not recommended). They include current limiting resistors, so just add 12 volts and you're good to go.

Oh, and did we mention they are waterproof? They are IP66 rated which means they can handle a pretty good soaking of water.

Note: These come in 5m segments on a reel. They are preterminated with wires, as shown in the pictures.

Note: We just realized the green and blue labels have been swapped.

Documents:

Comments 15 comments

  • What’s the maximum supply voltage for this LED strip? The data sheet just says “12 VDC” without giving a range or tolerance. My unregulated 12 VDC supply might put out between 11 VDC - 15 VDC. Will this damage the LEDs?

    • any news on this? anyone test it?

      im looking for max and min voltages. is it safe to hook into car power (8-15v)?

  • Can i affix these directly to metallic objects? Or must they first be insulated?

  • The datasheet says “Current per 3 LEDs(separable every 3LEDs): 60mA"
    Does that mean that this will draw (at max current for all leds) (30led/m)(5m)(60mA/3) = 3A?
    What can I use to drive this at close to full brightness? BlinkM MaxM? Shiftbar? (not looking to roll my own PWM solution)

  • There are some weather-proof versions of this stuff out there.
    Please consider carrying some of that in your product lineup!
    thanks

  • I have a strip of RGB’s similar to this. Can you snip the ribbon at any point?
    The ones I have let you cut the strip at certain intervals and have pads where you can solder on wires.

    • The strip consists of groups of 3 RGB LEDs which are connected in series. You can see that each group has 3 current limiting resistors, 1 for each colour. That’s why you’re only supposed to cut the strip at specified locations.
      If you cut at a different location, you would split apart a group. Then you would have to make somewhat inconvenient connections at that cut and add additional current limiting resistors.

    • No, there are only pads at certain locations, but they are every few inches though. But, it might be possible to scratch or burn away the coating and expose the traces.

  • Can anyone explain the image that has what looks like a balloon in it?
    (Feel free to delete this post if that image is a “typo”.)

    • Check out the new product post tomorrow, I show what it is.

      • Didn’t see the product that looks like a balloon in the new product list the other day…. keeping us waiting?

        • Video in discussion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1Iz93qnzRY
          The white thing is an acrylic globe used on street lights from http://www.lamppostglobes.com/. I used it just as a good diffuser. I used the Danger Shield to control the three levels and our new MOSFET 6-channel power shield to control the RGB LEDs.

  • Another comment, could you list the Watts per meter or similar spec for these strips? Thanks!

    • We are going to get a full datasheet on all the strip LEDs, but didn’t want to hold up the product.

  • I’ve used a similar strip with a BlinkM maxM, very nice!


Related Products