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Description: Solenoids are a great way to induce linear motion for pushing, pulling or controlling switches and levers. According to the datasheet this solenoid is rated for 36V but they work like a charm at 12V. We've been controlling them with the Arduino Power Driver Shield, there's even some example code below. With a throw of 10mm these solenoids are great for all kinds of motion applications such as actuating door latches, automating percussion instruments or just poking people.

Note: The datasheet indicates a throw of 25mm however we've measured a throw of 10mm.

Documents:

Comments 56 comments

  • What units is the force in? PSI? Pounds? Grams? Newtons?

    • See the datasheet, there are figures for g of pull at various stroke distances.

      • Can you help me, what does 3200g means?

        • g is grams. “1mm / 3200g” means that the energized solenoid could close from a stroke distance of 1mm while lifting a maximum of 3200 grams (3.2 kg) of weight. Any more weight than that, or a longer stroke, and it won’t be able to pull closed. Longer strokes support less weight because the core is further away from the magnetic coil and won’t be able to generate as much attractive force.

  • What is the thread pitch on those tapped mounting holes?

    • Just tested the threaded holes on the ones I received today. I was able to fit both an M3 and a 4-40. But, the M3 was a little more snug, and being that the data sheet is in metric, I’d probably guess that they were tapped as M3’s.

  • As far as solenoid control goes, I’ve heard that pulsing the solenoid will allow it to operate better at lower power. Anyone have any insight on this?

  • I don’t see it on the datasheet but is there any way to know whats the inductance/resistance for the solenoids coil?

  • Hi. I’m looking for ideas on how to get this solenoid the right amount of voltage. I admittedly know very little, so I got three A23 batteries (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A23_battery), and wired them in series, but I’ve still got a very, very weak response from the solenoid. Why didn’t this work?

  • Can it be used to push a bolt in a door like this and keep it there, and then maybe pull it so the door can be opened and keep it pulled for a long time ?

    Basically I’m looking for something that can be put in two states. “Pushed” and “pulled”. And remain in a state for an undefinite ammount of time.

  • YES! ok, i am a noob so please be gentle Lets assume i want to use this and am using this wiring diagram http://playground.arduino.cc/uploads/Learning/solenoid_driver.pdf This solenoid (according to the data sheet) is; 36V, 2.7A, 100W !!! I am open to any advice on selecting components for (the full 36v); 1) The diode? 2) The transistor? 3) The resistor? Many thanks - Philip … :)

  • Hello, I wanted to see if he can impose a peak voltage of about 150 V, for a fraction of a second, to perform a blow hard and fast? since in the datasheet nothing appears peak voltage that supports … thank you!

  • If you had 24V or even 12V solenoids, I would buy 100 units plus several TLC5940, for my piano project, but high current 36V power supplies are rare and sick expensive. 12V batteries x 3 is just an uncomfortable option I refuse.

    • So I take it you arent aware that you can run a solenoid rated for 36v just fine at 12v`s

      • You should know that a solenoid working at 1/3 of it’s rated voltaje, runs slow and weak. That issue for a piano project is useless, just like running a motor will run slower than at 100%.- Thanks for your comment anyway.

  • Video force units? “900” means nothing to me.

  • Need… to make… pinball machine…

  • Is this driven by PWM or can you just send current through it to engage the solenoid, say from a 9v battery?

  • Are these solenoids continuous duty?

  • Could I get some idea of the actual amount of force this outputs at various voltages? Say, at 5, 12, and 36?

  • Would 5 volts be enough to push a small button? I’m trying to avoid additional power supply.

    • Give the video in the description a watch. It will activate at 5 volts, but it won’t have near the linear force as it would at max voltage.

  • Any ideas what would cause these solenoids to get “sticky”? We’ve using one of these with an Arduino board, and noticed that after continued use it doesn’t want to release. Running consecutively at 30V after about 50 times it started to have a problem.
    As we kept testing to see what the problem was, the “sticking” got worse, to the point where it would happen every time. We then tested another of the same type of solenoid on the same circuit and was working fine.
    Any ideas?

    • I suppose it is possible that you’ve magnetized the plunger, lol.
      If so… in theory… you may be able to help the problem by flipping the polarity of the coil and cycling it that way a few times. Of course even if this did work I guess it would only remain neutral for a few cycles before becoming magnetized again the other way…
      The best way to deal with this common problem is to add a beefier return spring, the plunger will never become so magnetized that it will become useless so crank the voltage to compensate for the added mechanical resistance if necessary. Good luck!

    • describe ‘sticky’.
      are you over-saturating the coil? i’m not even sure if that’s something that’s even possible…

      • I’m working with andyinabox. By ‘sticky’, we mean it doesn’t release when the applied voltage (30V) is removed. The stickiness was present with a 15V power supply as well, so I don’t believe it has to do with over-saturating the coil (I’m also not sure if that’s possible).
        When the solenoid is stuck, a very gentle nudge is all it takes to release it… we’re considering simply trying a stronger spring. But it seems weird that it sticks at all.

      • Try some lube.

  • Could somebody plaese tell me what the weight of this part is, as I couldn’t find this information in the datasheet?

  • where did you get the force sensor? I want one that is accurate?

  • Are there any max time, due how long it can be energized? Im thinking about using it for a lock mechanism, so it will be energized for longer periods during weekends and holidays. Or would it be better to “invert” it so lock is open when its energized?

    • It depends on whether you want it to default to the locked position or the open position. With this as the deadbolt, it’d fail (when the power is broken) to the unlocked position.
      Personally, I’d prefer it to fail in the unlocked position if it was a egress door as if there was a fire or natural disaster, I’d want my doors to actually let me leave. Your housing code may also require this.
      CUE: 2001 The Space Odyssey : Open the pod doors, HAL….. I can’t let you do that Dave…….

      • Except that then when the power goes off, people can steal your stuff. There are solutions that provide the best of both worlds - power to open the door so that the solenoid isn’t permanently powered up, and a manual override to release the lock from inside if the power fails. That is, of course, what happens with a powered strike plate - the handle itself remains “stock” so you can always use the door as designed.

  • what current does it consume? important to know for power source and driver selection

  • i never played with these but a idea hit me …if you remove the rod cant this like shoot metal balls?

    • This is a tricky thing to do. It’s called a coil gun and essentially what you’re trying to do is pull the ball toward the center of the coil and then shut it off so that as the ball passes through the center of the field it doesn’t begin to slow down again. and get stuck to the coil. Because the ball needs a “running start,” as it were, you’ll want a coil with two open ends, this solenoid has a taper to it so it wouldn’t do well for a coil gun. Many coil guns require large banks of capacitors to quickly energize and then disengage the coil, these can be hacked from disposable camera flashes. Have a look around YouTube and be safe!

    • That’s called a coil gun.

    • Depends on your definition of ‘shoot’ really. It’s unlikely this solenoid would be able to propel a metal ball with any velocity high enough to qualify for my definition of shoot.

    • Yes you could but then you’re destroying a solenoid you paid $15 for. It would be cheaper just to buy a spool of magnet wire and make your own coil.

    • I’ve never tried it, but theoretically, yes. from what I understand, as current moves through the coils, a magnetic force flows perpendicular to the current (which would be through the middle of the coil). This is what pulls the plunger.

  • I would love to see these supplied with the indicated 25mm throw along side the 10mm version. I have use for both and finding a solenoid supplier I’m comfortable ordering from is turning out to be a unique challenge. That and it’s always my preference to support Sparkfun rather than another supplier!

  • Are you sure about that 25mm throw? That’d be nearly 1 inch. Judging by the third picture and also today’s new products video, it looks like the throw is a lot closer to 14mm, or just over ½ inch.

    • We’ll check into it.

      • Might be that the rod is 25mm when fully extended… but part of it is sticking out when it’s unenergized. Throw would be just how much is sticking out the BACK up to the stop, so yeah looks more like 14mm-ish.

  • please add the type of solenoid in the description eg. push or pull

    • It depends on which way you polarize it. Solenoids are push by default, but you can reverse the current to make it pull.

      • Not really. It has a spring on it that returns it back to a set position. It’s a push type.

        • All of my solenoids are push and pull. I guess yours is different then.

          • The plunger is made of steel or some other ferrous metal. It has no permanent magnetic field. Consequently, when a magnetic field of either polarity is applied, an opposite field is induced in the metal.
            This causes the plunger rod to be pulled into the coil regardless of the polarity of the field.
            The spring is there to push the rod back out of the coil once power is removed.
            On a different note, this item looks like a good opportunity to teach beginners about Back EMF and the value of protection diodes on driver transistors.

            • Apparently my solenoids have permanent magnets in their shafts.

            • I agree on all counts… reversing current to a solenoid doesn’t change them from push to pull… it’s “attracting a ferrous metal into a magnetic field” not “attracting or repelling a permanent magnet based on the polarity of an induced electromagnetic field”…

        • Turn it around and fasten something to the other side (where the spring and retaining ring is) and it magically becomes a pull type.
          Outside the box, people. ;)

          • Push Solenoid: Apply voltage to make it push
            Pull Solenoid: Apply voltage to make it pull
            This is a push type. Pull types generally do not have a spring.
            Yes you could reverse it, but this is not it’s intended use. The thick side of the plunger is the butt.

  • can I plug this into the wall with some adapter to get the full 36 v?

    • I am wondering the same thing, if a guy does not have a desktop power supply what is the best way to get sufficient voltage to this thing?


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