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Description: Do you need 'moar power' for your wireless widget? The XBee-PRO XSC 900 MHz RF module features two times the throughput and 20 times less current draw than the previous XSC module. This version (S3B) features an ADF7023 transceiver from Analog Devices, which can toss your data up to 28 miles Line-of-Sight (LOS), along with low power consumption, drawing less than 2.5 uA in power down.

Also, the latest XBee-PRO XSC is firmware compatible with the legacy 9XStream® and the legacy XBee-PRO XSC modules. And because it's an XBee RF device it is, of course, pin compatible with existing through-hole XBee modules.

Not sure which XBee module or accessory is right for you? Check out our XBee Buying Guide!

Note: This module is not compatible with our Explorer interface boards due to an LED connected to pin 6 on the XBee header. We are currently looking into a solution for this issue.  

Note: Due to manufacturer's restrictions in other countries, we can only ship these to the USA and Canada. Sorry world!

Features:

  • Analog Devices ADF7023 Transceiver, Cortex-M3 EFM32G230 @ 28 MHz
  • 902 MHz to 928 MHz Frequency Band
  • 10 Kbps or 20 Kbps Data Rate
  • Up to 2000 ft (610 m) Indoor/Urban Range
  • Up to 9 mi (14 km) LOS w/ Dipole Antenna
  • Up to 28 mi (45 km) LOS w/ High-Gain Antenna
  • Up to 24 dBm (250 mW) Tx Power (Software Selectable)
  • Voltage Requirement: 2.4 to 3.6 VDC
  • Tx Current: 215 mA
  • Rx Current: 26 mA
  • Sleep Current: 2.5 uA
  • Wire Antenna

Documents:

Replaces: WRL-09085

Comments 18 comments

  • Can I use this with the Fio V3?

  • Is this module compatible with the current XBee library for Arduino? The Library page says it is compatible with Series 1 & 2. However, I’d like to know if this counts as one of those series.

  • is this compatible with ArduIMU?

  • If I have this module (w/ wire antenna) and a module w/ dipole antenna at the base station, Will I get 9mi LOS range? or should I have dipole antenna at both side?

    • Probably not. The features list states “Up to 9 mi (14 km) LOS w/ Dipole Antennaā€¯ This assumes perfect propagation of the signals. A long antenna has a different radiation pattern than a dipole and as a result, a long wire will have less gain than a dipole. You will likely see a useful range that is considerably less than 9 miles. Additionally, both styles of antenna have null areas where little signal is emitted. If your devices are aligned such that each is in the null of the others radiation pattern, you will see much much less than the ideal range. To further muck things up, if one antenna is aligned horizontally and the other is aligned vertically, they will be out of phase with each other and signal reception will be further degraded. That said, a dipole is not difficult to construct for the frequencies involved.. Give it a shot and see what happens. You can also install a long wire on your field module and a high gain directional on your base station. If you can track your field module with the high gain antenna (something you will probably have to do with the dipole anyway) you can probably expect better results. Visit the A.R.R.L. website for a truckload of antenna information.

  • What is the range of this thing with the provided wire antenna? This page claims “Up to 28mi w/ High-Gain Antenna”. What does this antenna count as?

    • If the picture above is any indication, it is a helically wound, end fed wire antenna. This is not a “High-Gain Antenna”.

  • I am trying to configure this with X-CTU, but when trying to read the “modem parameter and firmware” X-CTU says that “the modem configuration file is not found.” Updating does not fix the problem. I did remove the RSSI LED from the sparkfun explorer board and it works fine with other Xbees, series 1, series 2, and pro versions.

    Should I use XBP09-XSC?

  • As noted in the comments, plugging this module into an XBee Explorer module will cause X-CTU to lock up when trying to communicate with it. I unsoldered the RSSI resistor (broke off a solder pad in the process) to make it work. It seems “And because it’s an XBee RF device it is, of course, pin compatible with existing through-hole XBee modules.” isn’t entirely true.

  • This board does not work with the standard adapter boards,as there is a pin change. This should have been made clear on this product page, would have saved me an hour of frustration. You have to modify the adapter board. Specifically, you have to physically remove the RSSI LED or the R4 resistor from the standard adapter board. The XSC has a different pinout compared to a normal XBee and this LED will drive the config pin low and cause the module to be unresponsive. See this thread: https://forum.sparkfun.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=33274

    • I apologize for this, we did not realize that they had modified the function of the RSSI pin making it not compatible. I will get the description updated and hopefully we will have a new board out soon that is compatible.

      • Yes, a new board for these would be good. :)
        Also, do you know anything about a different command set for this module - it appears the ATD1, ATD2 etc does not work ? Thanks, Rick

  • Hi

    what is better antenna to this?

  • I was on the beta test for these last year and fell in love! Just yesterday I did some testing (Ublox + UF.L S3B) and was able to get about a 1 mile radius at ground level in a suburban environment (small city, largely residential, rolling hills, little vegetation due to season).

    I am actually using these in a production product and can’t speak highly enough of this line. I bought my original XSC models for a drone and liked them… adding mesh to the lineup with these is an incredible upgrade.

    • Also, for those who really care… the S3B does not have an IC on the top of the board (the photo is an old XSC), though there is a pad there for it. The documentation exists through Digi to determine which chip they plan of having put there, but during the beta we were advised that there are other components missing from the board to make the IC functional (stated but I can neither confirm or deny). The IC is a Freescale MC9S08QE32 that is supposed to ship with an Eclipse IDE.

  • 900MHz does have less attenuation per “mile” than 2.4GHz, for sure. Laws of physics. And the “B” model radio does say it has up to 250mW transmitter power. Lots more than typical 2.4GHz products. In the US, FCC regulations restrict the transmitter on-time (duty cycle) in this band, in a complicated combination of data rate/bandwidth and duty cycle. Products that use frequency hopping are allowed higher duty cycle/bandwidth. These radios do use frequency hopping spread spectrum. Amazing for the cost.

    But 28 miles, even with the required high gain antennas for that line of sight range - is a marketing stretch. You might get that with a 9dBi yagi (big antenna) and with both ends elevated to clear the “Fresnel” zone for that long distance.

    But for sure, 100mW or (the cheaper one) at 900MHz with modest antennas and some non-LOS is a good thing for range well beyond what 2.4GHz can do.

    This 902-928MHz band is No. America only. I don’t think the EU (ETSI) has anything comparable - their 868MHz unlicensed is not enough spectrum to do FHSS like the 902-928MHz band.

    The 902-928MHz band, in the US, has lots of “SCADA” users in it, but that’s very low duty cycle.


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