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bboyho

Member Since: August 22, 2011

Country: United States

Profile

Bio

Engineer by day, bboy by night.

Organizations

Delta Chi Fraternity Inc. Worm Tank Crew

Universities

Electrical & Computer Engineering, Dec. 2011 College of Engineering and Applied Science University of Colorado at Boulder

Websites

https://sites.google.com/site/bcelement/home https://www.facebook.com/bboyho

  • Product COM-09181 | about 3 weeks ago

    To find information on modifying the Big Dome Push button with other LEDs, I recommend checking out this tutorial http://stuffandymakes.com/2011/01/08/hack-the-sparkfun-big-red-dome-button/.

  • Product WRL-09819 | about 3 weeks ago

    For enclosures, check John Biehler’s design available through here => http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:24399.

  • Tutorial - Beginning Embedded Electronics - 2 | about 3 weeks ago

    For an Arduino Bootloader, check here => http://code.google.com/p/optiboot/. This uploads the Arduino Uno Bootloader so that after using the programmer for the first time, you can upload firmware with an FTDI and the Arduino IDE without the need of the programmer.

  • Product PGM-09825 | about 3 weeks ago

    For an Arduino Bootloader, check here => http://code.google.com/p/optiboot/. This uploads the Arduino Uno Bootloader so that after using the programmer for the first time, you can upload firmware with an FTDI and the Arduino IDE without the need of the programmer.

  • Product ROB-11593 | last month

    Example code and hookup with an Arduino Uno, the Rover 5 Chassis, and Rover 5 Motor Driver => http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=82618.0

  • Tutorial - Beginning Embedded Electronics - 2 | about a month ago

    Hardware Setup

    The Pocket AVR Programmer can be used with this tutorial “Lecture 2 - How to Get Code Onto a Microcontrollerhttps://www.sparkfun.com/tutorials/93. This tutorial was originally referring to two other programmers and not the AVR Pocket programmer. The circuit had to be modified a little to get it working. First, you need to build the circuit on the breadboard. I didn’t need to add the voltage regulator to my setup since the AVR Pocket Programmer can provide the 5V. Make sure that you flip the switch to “Power Target.” I did use two 0.1uF decoupling capacitors in the circuit, LED for blink, LED for power, reset button, and associated resistors as explained in the tutorial. One thing I did was to add a 16MHz crystal on pins 9 and 10 of the Atmega328p.

    Install Driver and WinAVR

    Make sure that you install the driver for your Pocket AVR Programmer. They can be found in the documents section under the Windows Driver link. After installing, the Pocket AVR Programmer will come up as a new tree under libusb-win32devices -> USBtiny.

    Also, make sure that you are installing the latest version of WinAVR http://sourceforge.net/projects/winavr/files/. For more information on Downloading, Installing, and Configuring WinAVR, check out this pdf => http://winavr.sourceforge.net/install_config_WinAVR.pdf.

    Modifying the Make File

    I had to do some modifications in order to use the Pocket AVR Programmer in the old tutorial. I was using the ConText editor [http://www.contexteditor.org/index.php] instead of Programmer’s Notepad or JFE that was explained in the tutorial to modify the Make File. The code in the ConText editor was highlighted using the C/C++ option to read the file easier. Under the section that says “Programming Options (avrdude),” I had to modify two lines to get the Pocket AVR programmer working:

    1.) In line 200, change:

    AVRDUDE-Programmer = stk200 to AVRDUDE-Programmer = usbtiny

    2.) In line 207, change:

    AVRDUDE_WRITE_FLASH = -U flash:w:$(TARGET).hex to AVRDUDE_WRITE_FLASH = -F -U flash:w:$(TARGET).hex.

    The first modification was to set the programmer to use the Pocket AVR Programmer. The second line is to override a certain check by avrdude. I found this in the comments but didn’t run into this issue before and after modifying line 207. Keep in mind that # comments out a line.

    Compiling Hex File

    Open up the Command Prompt. I placed the blink_1MHz on my desktop but you can place it anywhere in your computer. Just make sure that you are in the same directory in the Command Prompt. Make sure that you know how to navigate through folders => http://www.wikihow.com/Change-Directories-in-Command-Prompt. After entering the correct directory, type make all to compile the hex file. This will output a lot of files in the blink_1MHz folder. The most important is the .hex file.

    If you want to change the c file, you must modify the c file, type make clean in the command prompt, and type make all again.

    Setting Fuse Bits, Uploading Hex File, and Setting Lock Bit

    You should try looking at the tutorial for installing an Arduino bootloader => https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/installing-an-arduino-bootloader/selecting-a-programmer. This will help in getting the correct connections from the programming cable to your breadboard Arduino. I double checked with a multimeter to check the wiring under the continuity setting. Also, the section under “Uploading Code - Hard Way” will be useful when in the Command Prompt to set the fuse bits, upload the hex file, and set the lock bits. The syntax is sensitive and you can have problems if you don’t write the correct commands.

    Since you are in the same directory already from compiling the hex file in the Command Prompt, you just need to type the two lines as stated in the tutorial to set the fuse bits and then upload the hex file and set the lock bit. Make sure that you change the hex file in the line …flash:w:hexfilename.hex to …flash:w:blink_1MHz.hex

    For more information, I recommend checking out the avrdude manual on the other options => http://www.nongnu.org/avrdude/user-manual/avrdude.html#Top.

    After doing all this setup, I was able to get the Atmega 328P microcontroller to blink with the Pocket AVR Programmer. Hope this helps.

  • Product PGM-09825 | about a month ago

    Hardware Setup

    The Pocket AVR Programmer can be used with one of our old tutorials “Lecture 2 - How to Get Code Onto a Microcontrollerhttps://www.sparkfun.com/tutorials/93. The tutorial was originally referring to two other programmers and not the AVR Pocket programmer. The circuit had to be modified a little to get it working. First, you need to build the circuit on the breadboard. I didn’t need to add the voltage regulator to my setup since the AVR Pocket Programmer can provide the 5V. Make sure that you flip the switch to “Power Target.” I did use two 0.1uF decoupling capacitors in the circuit, LED for blink, LED for power, reset button, and associated resistors as explained in the tutorial. One thing I did was to add a 16MHz crystal on pins 9 and 10 of the Atmega328p.

    Install Driver and WinAVR

    Make sure that you install the driver for your Pocket AVR Programmer. They can be found in the documents section under the Windows Driver link. After installing, the Pocket AVR Programmer will come up as a new tree under libusb-win32devices -> USBtiny.

    Also, make sure that you are installing the latest version of WinAVR http://sourceforge.net/projects/winavr/files/. For more information on Downloading, Installing, and Configuring WinAVR, check out this pdf => http://winavr.sourceforge.net/install_config_WinAVR.pdf.

    Modifying the Make File

    I had to do some modifications in order to use the Pocket AVR Programmer in the old tutorial. I was using the ConText editor [http://www.contexteditor.org/index.php] instead of Programmer’s Notepad or JFE that was explained in the tutorial to modify the Make File. The code in the ConText editor was highlighted using the C/C++ option to read the file easier. Under the section that says “Programming Options (avrdude),” I had to modify two lines to get the Pocket AVR programmer working:

    1.) In line 200, change:

    AVRDUDE-Programmer = stk200 to AVRDUDE-Programmer = usbtiny

    2.) In line 207, change:

    AVRDUDE_WRITE_FLASH = -U flash:w:$(TARGET).hex to AVRDUDE_WRITE_FLASH = -F -U flash:w:$(TARGET).hex.

    The first modification was to set the programmer to use the Pocket AVR Programmer. The second line is to override a certain check by avrdude. I found this in the comments but didn’t run into this issue before and after modifying line 207. Keep in mind that # comments out a line.

    Compiling Hex File

    Open up the Command Prompt. I placed the blink_1MHz on my desktop but you can place it anywhere in your computer. Just make sure that you are in the same directory in the Command Prompt. Make sure that you know how to navigate through folders => http://www.wikihow.com/Change-Directories-in-Command-Prompt. After entering the correct directory, type make all to compile the hex file. This will output a lot of files in the blink_1MHz folder. The most important is the .hex file.

    If you want to change the c file, you must modify the c file, type make clean in the command prompt, and type make all again.

    Setting Fuse Bits, Uploading Hex File, and Setting Lock Bit

    You should try looking at the tutorial for installing an Arduino bootloader => https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/installing-an-arduino-bootloader/selecting-a-programmer. This will help in getting the correct connections from the programming cable to your breadboard Arduino. I double checked with a multimeter to check the wiring under the continuity setting. Also, the section under “Uploading Code - Hard Way” will be useful when in the Command Prompt to set the fuse bits, upload the hex file, and set the lock bits. The syntax is sensitive and you can have problems if you don’t write the correct commands.

    Since you are in the same directory already from compiling the hex file in the Command Prompt, you just need to type the two lines as stated in the tutorial to set the fuse bits and then upload the hex file and set the lock bit. Make sure that you change the hex file in the line …flash:w:hexfilename.hex to …flash:w:blink_1MHz.hex

    For more information, I recommend checking out the avrdude manual on the other options => http://www.nongnu.org/avrdude/user-manual/avrdude.html#Top.

    After doing all this setup, I was able to get the Atmega 328P microcontroller to blink with the Pocket AVR Programmer. Hope this helps.

  • Product DEV-10116 | about 2 months ago

    To upload code, check this tutorial created by Arduino. You need a header pin and an FTDI => http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardFioProgramming.

  • Product SEN-10245 | about 3 months ago

    Someone made a 3D model for the load sensor here => http://www.123dapp.com/smb-123D_Design/Load-Sensor-SEN-10245-Rough-Model/1783357.

  • Product COM-09312 | about 3 months ago

    This is a latching hall effect sensor.

Name Pieces Total
SXSW 2014 Demo
11 45.55
Motor and Motor Mount
8 60.28
Camera Slider
8 37.02
Camera Tensioner/Idler
9 32.01
Basic Actobotics Automated Camera Slider
12 71.08
5V FTDI Basic Starter
3 20.4
Arduino Uno Basic Starter
2 33.9
RedBoard Basic Starter
2 28.9
XBee Pro Starter
4 125.8
Mixed Signal Costume
Based off Nate's tutorial on making your own Mixed Signa…
26 115.25