Creative Commons images are CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Description: This is the Teensy Audio board add-on for the Teensy 3.0 and 3.1 development boards. This audio board provides you with an easy-to-use tool to add high quality 16 bit, 44.1 kHz sample rate audio to your Teensy project. With the audio library provided in the Documents section below you will be able to use both the input and output simultaneously in order to make a variety of great audio projects, incorporate synth waveforms, effects, and mix multiple sound streams and cd quality audio to your headphones or different line outs!

The Teensy Audio board utilizes the SGTL5000 stereo codec with headphone amp IC to decode and drive audio files and the Cortex-M4 DSP instructions from the Teensy dev board to provide power to a real-time FFT. Each board is also equipped with 3.5mm audio jack for headphones, a micro-SD card slot for storing audio files, and optional spaces for a 25k potentiometer (volume control) and flash memory chip. The two rows of 14x1 headers are not included to give you the freedom to choose how to connect your audio board with your Teensy.

Features:

  • 16 bit, 441 kHz Sample Rate Audio
  • Plays Uncompressed WAV and Raw Audio Files
  • 4 Channel Software Mixer
  • 3.5mm Audio Jack
  • micro-SD Card Slot

Documents:

Recommended Products

Customer Comments

  • I have one of these, and sure enough it works. Be careful when connecting it to get it the right way around! There is no obvious mark to indicate which way it connects, and the headers are symmetrical so it fits over the Teensy 3/3.1 as easily backwards as it dos the correct way. The microSD card slot should be facing the opposite way as the Teensy USB connector. This is correctly shown in the Sparkfun breadboard photo.

  • I’m interested in buying one of these. I’ve been checking the PeakMeterStereo code and wanted to know, if using the line in pins, using the AudioInputI2S class, will this use any pins of the Teensy? And if yes, which ones? Also, the specific sketch imports the SPI library, but I can’t see where it’s used. Is it used for the I2S? Will there be any conflict if I use that code along with some other code that uses the SPI library to control shift registers? (actually I want to build a VU meter…).

    Thanks

  • I want to use an arduino to build an alarm clock with a customized wake sound. The sound file would be put on the card on a PC. I don’t need recording or DSP ability. The sound file would be 15-30 minutes long. Considering that use, does this chip handle the reading/file buffering itself?

  • Has anybody had success using these boards to record audio? E.g. voice? also what microphone hardware would be suitable?

    • The version 1.0 library has a recording example. Open it with File > Examples > Audio > Recorder.

      https://github.com/PaulStoffregen/Audio/blob/master/examples/Recorder/Recorder.ino

  • MKH / last year / 1

    I need to send pulses of tones from the right head phone to the left head phone. Is there a way to do that with this board?.

    • Well that’s an interesting question. I wonder what you really mean? Taken literally, of course both the left and right headphone signals are output, so you can’t input anything via the left headphone. You could get an input signal from the left line-in pin, or from the mic input.

      But maybe by “send pulses of tones from right … to left …”, maybe you mean creating tones independently on the left and right channel, varying their timing and intensity, so as to create a stereo effect that causes the listener to perceive spacial movement of a single audio source? If that’s what you mean, then yes, certainly you could a complex arrangement of AudioSynthWaveform, AudioEffectFader and AudioMixer4 objects, and of course your Arduino sketch to control them, which creates really interesting timing and intensity varying effects.

      But maybe you mean something else entirely?

      If you really, actually meant using the left headphone as some sort of audio input device, well, I’m afraid this hardware won’t help. Even if the headphones you’re using actually are a dynamic speaker which can function “in reverse” to sense sound, the headphone output on this board is an amplifier which passes the signal only in 1 direction. There is a mono mic input and stereo line-in signals, meant for input of signals, so you’d somehow have to connect to those to actually get a signal input from the left to then use in somehow controlling the right.

  • I am assuming that the mic-in header pins are connected to the SGTL5000 mic-in pins? The mic-in for the chip has programmable gain and bias. I don’t see a schematic here or on the PJRC product page so cannot confirm that myself.

  • How do you get the data onto the SD card? Through the teensy mic or line in?

  • Netduino hook up ?

  • So…not polyphonic, is it? Seems to be one stereo track at a time – although you can mix with an external source.

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet.