SparkFun Qwiic Pro Micro - USB-C (ATmega32U4)

Here at SparkFun, we refuse to leave 'good enough' alone. That's why we're adding to our line-up of Arduino-compatible microcontrollers once more! The SparkFun Qwiic Pro Micro is a revision of the original Pro Micro and is, overall, functionally the same as the previous version. The board is the same size as the original Pro Micro but we added a few additional features by shrinking down some components on the board such as a reset button, Qwiic connector, USB-C, and castellated pads (this makes it really handy for you custom keyboard creators out there)! Think the Pro Mini except with an ATmega32U4 on board and full USB functionality.

This tiny little board does all of the neat-o Arduino tricks that you're familiar with: nine channels of 10-bit ADC, five PWM pins, 12 DIOs as well as hardware serial connections Rx and Tx. Running at 5V and 16MHz, this board will remind you a lot of your other favorite Arduino-compatible boards but this little guy can go just about anywhere. There is a voltage regulator on board so it can accept voltage up to 6VDC. If you're supplying unregulated power to the board, be sure to connect to the "RAW" pin on not VCC.

The benefit of the reset button is to quickly reset the board or place it into bootloader mode without the need to take out a piece of jumper wire. The USB micro-b connector has been replaced with the USB type C connector. The through-hole pads have castellated edges for each pin to add a lower profile in your projects should you decide to build it into another assembly during production. Finally, a Qwiic connector is populated on the bottom of the board to easily add Qwiic enabled I2C devices to your projects!

Not sure which Arduino or Arduino-compatible board is right for you? Check out our Arduino Comparison Guide!


The SparkFun Qwiic Connect System is an ecosystem of I2C sensors, actuators, shields and cables that make prototyping faster and less prone to error. All Qwiic-enabled boards use a common 1mm pitch, 4-pin JST connector. This reduces the amount of required PCB space, and polarized connections mean you can’t hook it up wrong.


  • ATmega32U4 running at 5V/16MHz
  • AP2112 3.3V Voltage Regulator
  • Supported under Arduino IDE v1.0.1+
  • On-Board USB-C connector for programming
  • PTH Pads w/ Castellated Edges
  • 9x 10-bit ADC pins
  • 12x Digital I/Os (5 are PWM capable)
  • Hardware Serial Connections
    • UART (i.e. Rx and Tx)
    • Qwiic Connector for I2C
    • SPI
  • Small Arduino-Compatible Board
  • Reset Button
  • Dimensions: 1.3in x 0.7in

SparkFun Qwiic Pro Micro - USB-C (ATmega32U4) Product Help and Resources

New!

Qwiic Pro Micro USB-C (ATmega32U4) Hookup Guide

February 6, 2020

An overview of the ATmega32U4-based Qwiic Pro Micro USB-C, how to install it, and how to use it with Arduino.

Core Skill: Soldering

This skill defines how difficult the soldering is on a particular product. It might be a couple simple solder joints, or require special reflow tools.

1 Soldering

Skill Level: Noob - Some basic soldering is required, but it is limited to a just a few pins, basic through-hole soldering, and couple (if any) polarized components. A basic soldering iron is all you should need.
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Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

2 Programming

Skill Level: Rookie - You will need a better fundamental understand of what code is, and how it works. You will be using beginner-level software and development tools like Arduino. You will be dealing directly with code, but numerous examples and libraries are available. Sensors or shields will communicate with serial or TTL.
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Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
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Comments

Looking for answers to technical questions?

We welcome your comments and suggestions below. However, if you are looking for solutions to technical questions please see our Technical Assistance page.

  • if you set the solder-jumper to 3.3V operation the ATMEGA 32U4 still runs on 16MHz ? According to the Datasheet the max. allowed clock-frequency for 3.3V operation is 8MHz

    • Yep. We're overclocking it (out of spec) at 16MHz/3.3V. We've done this on a few thousand units and haven't seen issues but your mileage may vary.

  • Please Break out PF1(ADC1) and PF0(ADC0) to pads on the board surface! They have functions like differential ADC that are not on any other pins.

    • Good feedback! Thanks! Agreed. We'll try to get those out on a future rev.

  • Will there be a 3.3V / 8MHz version? I know there's a jumper for 3.3V operation, but there are applications where having it run at an 8MHz frequency is preferential.

  • Nice board - I will definitely be picking up a few for embedding into other projects!

    One bit of feedback: I don't see level shifters on the Qwiic port, which is fine for I2C since that is an open drain arrangement and VIL, VIH, and VOL are all suitable for 3.3V devices.

    However, a programming error could configure PD0 or PD1 as outputs driven high. In that case, the voltage on the Qwiic SDA/SCL lines would go up to near Vcc. The spec sheet says VOH is ≥ 4.2V @10mA if Vcc is 5V, and presumably it would go ≥ 5.2V if you run Vcc all the way to the limit.

    It is worth documenting this assumption, since a programming error could cause the Qwiic bus to go out-of-spec and potentially damage sensitive I2C devices.

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