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Retired RETIRED

This product has been retired from our catalog and is no longer for sale.

This page is made available for those looking for datasheets and the simply curious. Please refer to the description to see if a replacement part is available.

Replacement: None. We are retiring this product due to poor sales. This page is for reference only.

Description: The PSoC mixed signal array micro. These are very powerful, flexible, analog/digital based microcontrollers. Cypress part CY8C29466-24PXI with 32K Flash and 2K SRAM. The Cypress site is thick with great app notes and reference designs!

Features:

  • PWMs (8 to 32 bit)
  • PWMs with Dead band (8 to 32 bit)
  • Counters (8 to 32 bit)
  • Timers (8 to 32 bit)
  • UART 8 bit with selectable parity (up to 4)
  • SPI master and slave (up to 4 each)
  • I2C slave and multi-master (1 available as a System Resource)
  • Cyclical Redundancy Checker/Generator (8 to 32 bit)
  • IrDA (up to 4)
  • Pseudo Random Sequence Generators (8 to 32 bit)

Comments 14 comments

  • Retired?!? Noooooo! Back to Digikey, I guess.

  • The datasheet can now be found here

    I’m still trying to figure out how to program this chip… either via Buspirate or one of my arm dev boards. I connected the bus pirate to the chip giving it 5V power and the i2c ports on pins 10/11 or 13/15. When I do an i2c bus scan though nothing is found.

    I guess I should have invested the additional money to get the Geiner Board first…

    Can anyone point me to some sort of easy getting-started guide on what’s the best way to get initial communication going with this chip? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    • The PSoC MiniProg CY3217 is the best for programming it ($30 on digikey). I use these all the time for work, i love the 21x34 series as they have a built in hardware capacitance sensing module. I also use Cypress I2C-USB Bridge Kit for software debugging. It is a fairly easy device to use and it has some neat charting and datalogging features.

      • Thanks for the info. I found the progger on Mouser and put it in my “think about it” list. I’m just not sure I want to invest in yet another programmer so maybe I’ll be able to figure out how to program it with the bus pirate or one of my other I2C boards.

        • Got my programmer from mouser today and it worked right out of the box.

          I connected 5 jumper cables to the box and deployed my ready-made project within 5 minutes of unpacking the box (though I had the Software and Driver already installed on my PC). Now I can finally use this chip.

          I’ll still be trying to look into programming this chip with the bus pirate or an Arduino as I think that would make the chip a lot more interesting than having to buy a $30 programmer to use it that isn’t even available @Sparkfun.

          • Just get the I2C bridge for PSoC microcontrollers and don’t waste your time with an Arduino approach. The PSoC are the best and most versatile MCUs on the market. The Arduinos are kids toys compared to these. The I2C bridge is a very powerful debug tool and its all ready to go out of the box. $30 for a programmer is nothing in the world embedded development. You can analyze any variables or parameters in your code and output them on the I2C protocol and store/graph all day.

  • Wow! Just finished reading the data sheet. This is a bad a@@ chip. I can’t wait until I get to a point where I would need something with all the features this chip has to offer.

  • Datasheet:
    http://www.cypress.com/?docID=29431
    They changed it and the link Maragnus provided no longer works

    • If you have the PSoC Designer suite, then you would open it up and click on the help menu and then on documentation. The datasheet for Cypress PSoCs come with their software. You can either reference the datasheet on the Device (or its Family) or the Technical Reference Manual (TRM) for all the information on using the processor (Registors, Interrupts, Memory, etc..)

  • Does this part have any firmware installed? Does it contain the Bootloader (as used in the MP3 Trigger V2)?
    TIA

    • Its a standalone IC but you can install one yourself onto it.
      PSoC are the best microcontrollers. I have used AVRs, PICs, MSP430 and you can’t compare to PSoC. The ones with Capacitance Sensing are awesome (CY8C21x34 series).
      This is definitely not a beginner MCU, its takes some time to learn. But it puts Arduinos to shame.


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