Retired!

This is a retired product, but fear not as there is a newer, better version available: TOL-11130

Creative Commons images are CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Retired RETIRED

This product has been retired from our catalog and is no longer for sale.

This page is made available for those looking for datasheets and the simply curious. Please refer to the description to see if a replacement part is available.

Replacement: TOL-11130. We are now carrying this replacement part from Atten. This page is for reference only.

Description: Replacement heating element for hot-air rework stations. Compatible with Sunkko stations and our own branded rework station. The element is the same for other manufacturers and the connector can be modified by a skilled user to work with other manufacturers. This element includes a thermocouple element at the tip of the air flow with two wires to be connected to a temperature sensing circuit.

Comments 4 comments

  • I am interested in getting one of these but it would be helpful to know what the resistance of the heating element is. Looks like it can be driven at 100 to 200W but depending on the resistance this might be a 220V or 120V unit. The problem with running a 220V unit at 120V is that you only get 30% of the power output– probably will be difficult to get it hot enough.
    Could you please quickly touch the wires with a multimeter?
    From the color of the thermocouple wires, it seems that it is probably a K type thermocouple– per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermocouple
    and Sparkfun does cell a thermocouple amp.

  • Yeah, it would be really nice to know more about this element.
    I’m currently making a reflow soldering element, which involves a 240V PWM’d output (and also a 12V 20A pwm’d output, but this would only give 240W). Note that the base station is separate from the actual hot-plate element. It would be nice if I could just use this element and a tip to create a cheap add-on for the base station that would allow me to do Hot-air reworking.

    • Seconded. (thirdededed?)
      I would imagine starting at 12 volts to be safe, treat it like a big resistor. Once you get a measure of resistance you can figure out how much power to start with. What would be nice is to know the maximum operating temp, both at the tip, and of the coil its self. Then again this is asking a lot for a replacement part, we clearly have less conventional…purposes in mind.
      Chad, i know his is a late reply, but did you ever get this? and if so did you learn any thing about it?

  • whats the operating voltage for the coil? whats the amp draw?


Related Products