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Description: This is a great kit to learn the basics of soldering. ClockIt is a basic alarm clock with buzzer based on the ever popular ATMega328. If you're just learning how to solder, this kit should take you 15-20 minutes. If you're a weathered pro at soldering, this is a great relaxing build that should take 5-10 minutes.

We've made some changes to this kit so it's easier for beginners to solder: The ATMega footprint is wider so you don't need to bend any pins and we've also added some more silkscreen print to better indicate the polarity of the parts.

No programmer required. The ATmega comes with firmware installed!

Features:

  • Time (AM/PM)
  • Alarm (On/Off)
  • Snooze (alarm resumes after a 9 minute snooze)

Kit Includes:

  • 1 x ClockIt PCB
  • 1 x ATmega328 (pre-programmed)
  • 1 x 4-digit display
  • 1 x buzzer
  • 1 x 10uF cap
  • 1 x 0.1uF cap
  • 2 x 22pF caps
  • 1 x 10k resistor
  • 1 x 16MHz crystal
  • 1 x barrel jack
  • 1 x mini power switch
  • 3 x push button reset switches
  • 2 x Screws
  • 2 x Plastic Standoffs
  • 1 x 5V wall wart

Documents:

Replaces: KIT-10013

Comments 15 comments

  • Fun Kit. My son (7th grade) and I built this over Christmas. He learned to solder and I learned to program AVR’s. On the programing side there are a few things missing from the Source Code that need to be changed to get it working with the current hardware and latest (Dec 2013) WinAVR release. Also a few small bugs. I set up a GitHub repository with my modifications to the Sparkfun source code here: https://github.com/MarkDShattuck/Clockit. We also converted it to a stop watch (https://github.com/MarkDShattuck/Clockit-StopWatch). We plan to convert the hardware to take start/stop input from a laser/IR-receiver “trip line”.

  • Have you tested accuracy? No RTC present… how much time does this clock typically gain/lose?

    • lots. I built this with my son a while back. It was losing/ gaining minutes a day when we gave up on it. You can do a pretty good job of keeping time if you have a decent crystal, keep the temperature fairly stable, and compensate for the given crystal’s drift. I suspect either poor choice of crystals, or a bad batch of crystal’s for my clock’s poor performance.

      • The issue i found was in the software. In the interrupt routine, it resets the timer value for the next second.

        You can fix it by deleting “TCNT1 = 49911;” from the ISR and changing the timer setup in ioinit() to this:

        //Init Timer1 for second counting
        TCCR1A |= _BV(WGM11);
        TCCR1B = _BV(WGM13)|_BV(WGM12)|_BV(CS12)|(_BVCS10);
        TIMSK1 = _BV(TOIE1); //Enable overflow interrupts
        ICR1 = 15625;//set the top value (more reliable than the original)
        
  • My daughter learned to solder with this clock. Super nice!

    We want to re-program the clock to use it as a driver for a dimmer so we downloaded the source code above and loaded it onto a different ATMEGA328PU using our uno board. We then replaced the ATMEGA328PU that came with the clock with the one we downloaded the source code onto but the clock doesn’t work – all that happens is the buzzer is on continuously. Putting the original ATMEGA328PU back into the clock fixes the clock. Something is different between the ATMEGA328PU that came with the clock and the one we programmed with the source code.

    Is this source code the correct version etc.?

  • I am hoping someone can help me and my son fix the brightness (kid has to unplug it to go to sleep). We are novice (!) solderers and arduino programmers (generous description). I think I can figure out in the firmware how to adjust the brightness, maybe. But could someone spell out the specific steps to reprogram? What software do I need to compile and what type of connector do I need? Do I need a special programmer? Please assume you are talking to a someone slightly more intelligent than a monkey. My son LOVES (!) his clock he soldered, I would love to fix it for him. Thanks!

    • The firmware has the brightness code commented pretty well, that should be the easy part :)

      For programming, you’ll probably want to solder (not needed, but more reliable than smooshing it into place) some headers to the board at the ISP pads (the 3x2 unpopulated pads on the board), so that you can easily connect a programmer to it. There’s lots of tools that will let you re-program the microcontroller (check the exact model through the labeling on top), but perhaps the easiest first step would be grabbing AVR Studio (Link is for AVR Studio 6, older versions are also available). See also the forums where there are some existing discussions about reprogramming a ClockIt :)

      • Thank you for taking the time to answer! I appreciate it. I will check out the links and see what I can do. I am sure it will be less time consuming than resetting the clock every morning!

  • It seems that ATMEGA168 was used instead of ATMEGA328PU!

  • If i can help, here’s the pinout of the display : Commun anode 1 : pin 1 Commun anode 2 : pin 3 Commun anode 3 : pin 7 Commun anode 4 : pin 8

    B = pin 4 A = pin 6 C = pin 11 F = pin 13 d = pin 14 g = pin 15 e = pin 16 . = pin 2

    it seems that for the : , you have to put pin 5 to +5v and pin 12 to a 330 ohm resistor and then to ground, i didn’t used the pin 2 for this project, i uploaded it into the ATMEGA168, so i didn’t buy the kit! I didn’t used the COL either.

    I hope this helps! good night! marC:)

  • What is the 7 segment display used here ? what is the number id??

    thank you! marC:)

  • This is a useful little kit not only as a clock but also as a generic display device. If only the designer had not used all of the analog input pins to drive the LED segments… this little kit could have made a nice custom panel meter (maybe to display voltage or current?).

    One suggestion: This kit NEEDS a 28 pin 0.300 wide socket for the 328p chip. Radio Shack doesn’t seem to carry 28 pin narrow sockets, but TWO 14 pin sockets in-line work just fine!

    Here is a link to a photo of my board with two Radio Shack sockets installed: http://www.gunsnet.net/photopost/data/500/medium/clock-kit-socket.jpg

    One last suggestion: This board should have a place to install an optional 3 terminal regulator (either through-hole or SMT) since it would be nice to use a 9v or 12v wall-wart instead of just 5 or 6 volts.

    Otherwise, wonderful kit! It was loads of fun to assemble.

  • Just completed my clockit build which was easy to assemble and works great! But, i’m wondering is there any way to reduce the brightness of the display? At night my whole room illuminates blue.

  • The link to the schematic and assembly instructions does not work.


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