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Description: Check out these big 10mm through-hole LEDs! The opaque epoxy package causes these LEDs to have a soft, diffuse glow.

Features:

  • Forward Voltage (R/G/B): 2.0 / 3.2 / 3.1V
  • Forward Current: 20mA
  • Intensity (R/G/B): 550 / 250 / 700 mcd

Documents:

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Customer Comments

  • Is this common anode or common cathode? Can that be added to the product description, thanks!

    • Common cathode, it says so right on the data sheet. RTFM.

      • I read the data sheet three times and it does not say in text the configuration. Just realized I had to install the chineese language pack to see the schematic image.

        • Well then I apologize. I had to install the Chinese language pack a while back. I didn’t even think about that.

  • I made a nice little color changing light with this, if you just got one and you want to see lots and lots of colors, try this code.

    /*
    LED addict, 1-26-14
    This is a light that fades from one color into the next.
    Circuit:
    *An RGB LED, connected to pins 11, 10, and 9, each with their own resistor(I used 330 ohm)
    */
    
    int Led1 = 11;
    int Led2 = 10;
    int Led3 = 9;
    void setup()
     {
     pinMode(Led1, OUTPUT);
     pinMode(Led2, OUTPUT);
     pinMode(Led3, OUTPUT);
     }
    void loop()
     {
      int Output1 = 225;
      int Output2 = 0;
      while(Output2 < 225)
       {
        analogWrite(Led1, Output1);
        analogWrite(Led2, Output2);
        Output1--;
        Output2++;
        delay(30);   //Edit these delays to change the speed, lower numbers will increase the speed and vice-versa
       }
      int Output3 = 0;
      while(Output3 < 225)
       { 
        analogWrite(Led2, Output2);
        analogWrite(Led3, Output3);
        Output2--;
        Output3++;
        delay(30);   //Yes, this one too
       }
      while(Output1 < 225)
      {
      analogWrite(Led3, Output3);
      analogWrite(Led1, Output1);
      Output3--;
      Output1++;
      delay(30);   //Last one
      }
    }
    
    • If you shorten the delays to 1 millisecond and you add another 1000 millisecond delay after every while loop you’ll get a nice pause effect. :)

  • I will gladly take 10 of these beauties!

  • These are very nice. They are common cathode devices. With the diffused case and depending on which colors (RGB) are turned on, one can get eight different colors. For good color balance the current limiting resistors need to be different. For a 5 volt supply, I found using a 330 ohm for red, 510 ohm for green and 270 ohm for blue gave reasonable colors for cyan, magenta, and white. The eighth color is black with all leds off. They can be used to show how the properties of color addition.

  • I connected these directly to my arduino’s analog pins and scaled down my analogWrite maximum based on each led’s typical forward voltage. The safe ranges turn out to be R: 0-102, G: 0-163, B: 0-158 (using forwardVolage/5 * 255). No Resistors needed!

  • LED addict, thanks for the code. Used as my ‘Blink’, first upload to an arduino. Works great and helped me figure out how to code my own.

  • Can you provide this 10mm RGB LED as a super bright with clear epoxy?

  • Can anyone provide the exact pin pitch on these?

    • In case anyone else is laying out a circuit board, I measured the pin pitch at 0,05" The pins are 0.02" diameter. Contrary to the datasheet, there is no noticeable flat side of the package, you will have to orient them using the pins lengths.

  • I’m having trouble getting the green element to work. With a 5V Arduino PWM output, I’m using a 100 ohm resistor for green, 100 for blue and 220 for red. It worked at initially for a short time, but it doesn’t light anymore no matter what I try. I’m having the same problem with two different ones of these, but I have no idea whether I’m doing something wrong.

    • Your resistor values are fine. Green forward voltage drop is 3.2V so (5 V-3.2 V)/100 Ohms equals 18mA which is less than the rated value of 20mA. You may have gotten a defective part or your resistor failed. Both of these happen sometimes (or even your Arduino PWM port failed. That has happened to me recently. You can try swapping connections to troubleshoot that.

  • Just FYI (For Your Information): You need 3 resistors to get it working smoothly when driving it with PWM from an arduino, one for each color. Putting just one resistor between the LED and GND gives a strange flickering.

    Someone else could probably tell more about why this is happening. I think it has something to do with the dropout voltage differing on the different colors.

    • Oddstr13
  • I must say, these are beautiful LEDs. I got one on my last order, but I think I’ll get 10 more next time.

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