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Description: This is the SparkFun MOSFET Power Control Kit, a breakout PTH soldering kit for for the RFP30N06LE N-Channel MOSFET. This kit is extremely simple to assemble with only 10 pins to solder. If you are looking for a little more control over projects that require a little more power than normal but need a better way than your breadboard, this kit is perfect for you

Included in each kit is a SparkFun MOSFET Power Control PCB, two screw terminals (one 2-pin and one 3-pin), a 10k resistor, and a single RFP30N06LE MOSFET. What we really like about this particular MOSFET is that it’s very common and offers very low on-resistance with a control (gate) voltage that is compatible with any 3-5V microcontroller or mechanical switch. This allows you to control high-power devices with very low-power control mechanisms.

Note: While the MOSFET is rated to 60V 30A, the circuit board traces are only rated to 3.5A.

Includes:

Documents:

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Customer Comments

  • ——————– Tech Support Tips/Troubleshooting/Common Issues ——————–

    Pinouts and Example Hookup

    To connect the n-channel mosfet kit with the load on the high-side and turn on one color on the 12V non-addressable LED strip [ https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12023 ]:

    System

    “C” = Gate, connect to microcontroller I/O

    “-” = Source, for reference connect microcontroller’s GND and the power source’s GND

    “+” = Vcc, connect to the “+” terminal of your power source

    Device

    “-” = Drain, connect this to “R”, “G”, or “B” cathode (-) of the 12V LED strip

    “+” = 12V, connect to “12V” pin of the 12V LED Strip

    Here is an example using a 12Vdc light bulb https://drive.google.com/a/sparkfun.com/file/d/0B0jwgLkjMWzDRnYzc1VRdnJDZVk/view.

    Feel free to look at this tutorial on the n-channel MOSFET for an example and tips on using the transistor => http://bildr.org/2012/03/rfp30n06le-arduino/.

  • hey good luck wiring this if you don’t have EAGLE. The schematic makes some sense but it doesn’t have corresponding markings with the PCB so it doesn’t help you wire the mosfet.

    • Gate is the control pin marked C on the 3 pin connector.
    • Drain is the (-) pin on the 2 pin connector
    • Source is the (-) pin on the 3 pin connector
    • both (+) pins are connected.

    I shorted the (+) and (-) source pin to make more landing spots for Source as the board seems pretty useless for my projects without this.

  • Is it me or the label behind the board is in the reverse. For the 3Pin connector from top, left to right you have “C” “-” “+”, bu then in tutorials for examples https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/led-light-bar-hookup/example-circuits they are connected as “+” “-” “C” . Label should be corrected I think.

    EDIT: For this board the label is correct, the tutorial may be using other version.

  • Need HELP! How do i wire this kit? I have arduino connected to my motorcycle 12v. My purpose is to control 2 LED aux Lights (12v 20w each one) using PWM from Arduino. Should i connect the 2 wires from the battery to the 3 pin side of this kit, then connect from arduino 1 PWM wire + 1 GND to the 3 pin side, and on the 2 pin side the 2 wires follow to the Led Aux Lights. It is OK? Do you think i will need heatsink? (how big should i use?). Thank you very much.

  • Could this device be used to control a signal line? Specifically one from a USB source.

  • Can this guy control 48V motor?

  • Can someone explain the 10K resistor in this circuit? Does it provide ESD protection?

    • MOSFET gates are easily damaged when left floating because there is no circuit path for static discharge. (Other than through the thin gate insulation which would be bad). With a pull-down resistor on the gate you create another path. Also you ensure the MOSFET is in the off state when disconnected.

  • I love these little things but really wish they would come with an optional 1N4007 diode for flyback elimination when driving an inductive load.

  • Would it be okay to send about 10 A at about 12 V through one of these? I’m looking to build a BLDC motor control circuit and 10 A is the stall current of the motor.

    • The schematic says that the pcb traces only allow for 3.5 amps.

    • Survey says: Yes. Datasheet says 60 volts max drain, and 30 (!!!) amps continuous. (Power dissipation is 96 watts to +25 degrees centigrade.)

      TBH: I’d have more concern over those screw terminals and the traces than the MOSFET itself. (Terminals are rated for 6 amps as 125 VAC.)

      • Actually the datasheet says “maybe”. Looking at Figure 1 it looks like 10A at 12V is just slightly out of it’s safe operating area for DC. If you’re using a pulse width of 100ms or shorter you should be fine, but if you’re using this as a switch to just turn the motor on you might have an issue especially if your environment is warmer than 25C. If I was going to give this a try I’d make sure to exceed the datasheet’s recommended heat sink and/or use active cooling on it to give myself a better chance that it won’t toast itself. Just my $.02

        PS: 12V at 10A DC is 120W which is greater than it’s 96W power dissipation.

        • Wouldn’t that depend on where this 12 V actually is? If the MOSFET is turned on hard (say Vgs = 5V) Rds(on) will be about 0.047 ohms, at 1/20 of an ohm, 10A across the MOSFET is about 1/2V (the other 11.5V is across the motor) That would be around 5W for the MOSFET, one would want a heat sink, but otherwise it seems to me that would be ok. If one it trying to turn in on with 3V, I’d suggest one be generous with the heat sink with Vgs =3, Rds(on) may be 2 or 3 times as high as it is at 5V, if I’m interpreting figure 6 correctly.

          • Keep in mind that 10 A is the stall current, which will always be higher than the run current. Testing for a stall condition shouldn’t be too hard (built-in reed switches). I used to have a link to the motors datasheet, but it quit working and I deleted it. The motor has three leads instead of four. I forget the configuration name, but it requires two leads to be used at a time: one tied to Vcc, one to Vdd, and one disconnected altogether. I would need six of these things to be able to run the motor and I was trying to determine what my best option is (mosfet switches or solid state relays or whatever else).

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5

Based on 7 ratings:

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2 of 2 found this helpful:

Confusing!

In the end I had to buzz this out as I found the layout very confusing.


2 of 2 found this helpful:

Only good for 3.5 amps

The MOSFET is rated for 60 volts, 30 amps. The circuit board traces are rated only for 3.5 amps.
This information should be included in the description of the product. It’s misleading.

Sorry about the mix-up. We did have it listed in the schematic file under documents, but I can see how it would be misleading. We’ve added that as a note under the description. Thanks for raising that to our attention.


1 of 1 found this helpful:

good luck understanding this little board

good luck wiring this without Eagle. The schematic makes some sense but doesn’t correspond with the board markings… whats this RAW tag in eagle… what the heck does RAW mean..

I’d also have more landings for source as you at least always need to connect your control source and your high voltage source, right? Well assuming that you have two different voltages, say a 3.3 volt uController and a 12volt LED. That would make this a nice little board.

We use RAW to label power lines that have not passed through a voltage regulator, or to mark a variable voltage input into the system. There is usually a note designating the acceptable voltage range near the input on the schematic. In this case, the device can take a voltage up to 60V.

I’m sorry the connection steps were not clearer, this tutorial may help others in their hook up - http://bildr.org/2012/03/rfp30n06le-arduino/


quick solution

This is a good product to quickly control ~3A loads from a MCU


0 of 2 found this helpful:

Works as expected

The easiest way to dim LEDs!


Simpel and it works!

I am working with an raspberry pi 3 and have an actuator that needs 24 volts. And this circuit is perfect for this! so now i am controlling it with a 3.3 volts PWM an it converts it to 24 volts PWM.


Very flexible and simple to use

I use these little boards to add LED lighting control to my Photon boards. I’ve experimented with using custom PCBs for my Photon based projects that incorporate this functionality, but each Photon board ends up controlling a different number LEDs. I’ve found that creating a generic PCB for the MCU, and attaching as many of these as needed works pretty well. These are super easy to assemble and connect, especially in my RV since lighting is all 12v anyways. I’ve never had a problem with these boards, and I’m currently using a couple dozen of them. I give it 4 stars instead of 5 because the output screw terminal is too small for the heavy gauge wire used in my RV. I can fix this though by using a larger screw terminal block that I purchase separately.