SparkFun Qwiic Flex Glove Controller

Flex sensors are great for telling how bent something is in a project, but we’ve been running into issues with durability when using them in wearable applications like gloves. The SparkFun Qwiic Flex Glove Controller isolates the weak point on each flex sensor to allow for more permanent applications. Essentially, this board allows you to incorporate flex sensors into a glove to control lighting, sound, and other effects making it perfect for wearable and e-textile applications! To make it even easier to use this controller, all communication is enacted exclusively via I2C, utilizing our handy Qwiic system. However, we still have broken out 0.1" spaced pins in case you prefer to use a breadboard.

The Qwiic Flex Glove Controller has been equipped with an on-board ADS1015 ADC to I2C chip, that way you will be able to get a multitude of analog inputs without needing to touch the microcontroller’s ADC pins. If you plan to incorporate this controller board into gloves (since that is what it was originally designed for) to get sensors on eight fingers (thumbs not included), you will need four Qwiic Flex Glove Controllers. With two gloves equipped with these boards you can even begin making your own VR glove controllers! If you have four controllers on the same I2C bus, you’ll need to use every address available to the ADS1015, luckily there are four available!


The SparkFun Qwiic Connect System is an ecosystem of I2C sensors, actuators, shields and cables that make prototyping faster and less prone to error. All Qwiic-enabled boards use a common 1mm pitch, 4-pin JST connector. This reduces the amount of required PCB space, and polarized connections mean you can’t hook it up wrong.


Get Started with the SparkFun Qwiic Flex Glove Controller Guide

  • Operating Voltage: 2.0V - 5.5V
  • Operating Temperature: -40°C - 125°C
  • Resolution: 12 bit
  • Sample Rate: 128Hz - 3.3kHz
  • Current Consumption: 150µA (Typ.)
  • I2C Address: 0x48 (default), 0x49, 0x4A, 0x4B
  • 2x Sewing Holes
  • 2x Qwiic connectors

SparkFun Qwiic Flex Glove Controller Product Help and Resources

Qwiic Flex Glove Controller Hookup Guide

July 19, 2018

Is your finger bent? Is your finger straight? The Qwiic Flex Glove controller board will answer this age old question for you with the flex sensor!

Core Skill: DIY

Whether it's for assembling a kit, hacking an enclosure, or creating your own parts; the DIY skill is all about knowing how to use tools and the techniques associated with them.

1 DIY

Skill Level: Noob - Basic assembly is required. You may need to provide your own basic tools like a screwdriver, hammer or scissors. Power tools or custom parts are not required. Instructions will be included and easy to follow. Sewing may be required, but only with included patterns.
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Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

3 Programming

Skill Level: Competent - The toolchain for programming is a bit more complex and will examples may not be explicitly provided for you. You will be required to have a fundamental knowledge of programming and be required to provide your own code. You may need to modify existing libraries or code to work with your specific hardware. Sensor and hardware interfaces will be SPI or I2C.
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Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
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