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Description: The smallest and easiest to use serial conversion circuit on the market! This board has one purpose in life - to convert RS232 to TTL and vice versa (TX and RX). This will allow a microcontroller to communicate with a computer. Shifter SMD is powered from the target application and can run at any voltage! That's right - power the board at 5V and the unit will convert RS232 to 5V TTL. Power the board at 2.8V and the Shifter board will convert RS232 to 2.8V CMOS TTL. Includes two indicator LEDs for TX and RX. Runs from 300bps up to 115200bps.

This version comes with no DB9 connector attached. Useful for field installations and projects where RS232 serial is coming from something other than a DB9 cable.

Dimensions: 1.2x1.1"

Documents:

Comments 12 comments

  • “…can run at any voltage!"
    challenge accepted. My friend has a tesla coil.

  • Could two these be used with two of the XTend 900 1W RPSMA - 40 Mile Range to facilitate two way communication of an rs-232 setup. I don’t think sparkfun sells the interface boards made by Digi International that would take care of the logic level conversions. Thanks!

  • TX-O on this goes to Arduino’s RX RX-I on this goes to Arduino’s TX

    To solder this one to a Female DB9 cable: - The square pin marks Pin 1 of the cable. Most cables have pin numbers etched on the from of the connector. If yours doesn’t have these markings, put the female connector behind the PCB, so the pins align. This way you can see that Pin #1 is on the upper right. To get to Pin #9 count counter-clockwise.

  • For those looking at this for their BeagleBone Black; I can verify that this board works quite well at the 115200 baud rate used for that system. Since I have a native EIA-232 port on my mobo, I picked up one of these with a PRT-00429 and I haven’t looked back. Just make sure to pick up a true pass-through DB-9 cable if you go this route.

  • I’d like to connect a serial device that has a female plug (much like a Weather Underground station) to my Arduino. The Arduino just needs to receive data (a short burst of ASCII every minute at 9600 baud); it doesn’t need to transmit. I guess I want my Arduino to be a DTE, not a DCE?

    There’s no male version of the DB9 component (like PRT-00429) sold to go with this board. So … can I get a ribbon cable instead, with the DB9 connector (PRT-11156), and just solder the leads directly to this board? Which pins should I solder to which holes? Or, is this overkill, and all I need to do is make a voltage divider to step the 12v from the device down to 5v?

    • Just struggled with this for several days–if the serial device has the DB-9 plug, then it’s at RS-232 level. That makes it the computer (DTE) for the purpose of this shifter. The Arduino/Netduino at TTL level is the modem (DCE). Or, I’ve completely lost my mind, which is quite possible at this point.

  • OK, may be a silly question, but the board seems to have white paint around the pin contacts where I’d expect to see copper. Do I just ignore it and solder as normal? It vapourises??

    • That’s actually tinned copper. It reflects rather brightly in our studio, but it’s silver in real life and very easy to solder to.

  • I would like to see a smaller version of this board. Just have the needed pins for the DB-9. Makes it more embeddable.

    I play with devices that put out RS-232, but DB-9 is an option. So a small rs-232/ttl converter would be great.

  • I just spent several days trying to figure out a problem with a data communication project. It was traced back to this level converter. As mentioned/quoted by Paradoxial this type of “voltage stealing” converter may not work particularly well in all situations. Using a “real” level converter (using something like a Maxim 232 chip) might be a safer bet.
    I love Sparkfun products, but this is one I can’t fully recommend. It worked OK on an Arduino but not on other projects.

  • Ok, so how does sending a transmission of a TTL get magically “boosted” up to +-12Volts RS232 on the other side when the only power supply is the TTL voltage?

    • A quotation from the other shifter comment page:

      “It uses the transmitted signal input from the PC on the DE-9 connector ("RS-In” signal on the schematic) to charge a 10 uF capacitor (C1) through a diode (D1). The way it is connected, the capacitor will be charged produce a negative voltage with respect to ground. This voltage is made visible on the DE-9 transmit line (“RS-Out”) through a weak (10 K ohm) pull up resistor. The PNP transistor in U1 (the transistor with its base connected to the TTL side RX-I line) overwhelms the weak pull up when RX-I is low, pulling the RS-Out line up to Vcc (+5 V, +3.3 V, or whatever the TTL side device provides).
      Therefore the “RS-232” outputs will range from, for a mark (1) bit, approximately 0.7 V above the negative voltage provided by the PC’s output signal (0.7 V drop due to the diode forward voltage drop); and for a space (0) bit, the signal will be Vcc (5 V, 3.3 V, or whatever).
      I wonder if this will work reliably for 2.8 V target since RS-232 specifies that -3 V to +3 V is an invalid signal level.
      It’s a clever little hack that uses so few components… kind of cool but perhaps not as reliable as a “proper” RS-232 level shifter?“ - ColinB


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