Rotary Potentiometer - Linear (10k ohm)

An adjustable potentiometer can open up many interesting user interfaces. Turn the pot and the resistance changes. Connect VCC to an outer pin, GND to the other, and the center pin will have a voltage that varies from 0 to VCC depending on the rotation of the pot. Hook the center pin to an ADC on a microcontroller and get a variable input from the user!

This is a center-tap linear type potentiometer. The outer two pins will always show 10K resistance, the center pin resistance to one of the outer pins will vary from 10K Ohm to about 50 Ohm. The pot is linear meaning the resistance will vary linearly with its position. This is a good choice for general user interfaces.

This pot works great in a breadboard but on a few breadboards, you may have to trim off the large metal anchors.

Model #: R0902N-DD1-B10K-GP

Rotary Potentiometer - Linear (10k ohm) Product Help and Resources

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Skill Level: Noob - Some basic soldering is required, but it is limited to a just a few pins, basic through-hole soldering, and couple (if any) polarized components. A basic soldering iron is all you should need.
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Comments

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  • Goatrider / about 13 years ago / 3

    Which pin is the outer pin for the VCC and the GND? Is it pin 1 for VCC and pin 3 for GND?
    It can go either way, depends which way you want to turn the knob for "up".

  • unebonnevie / about 13 years ago / 2

    The description says: "Turn the pot and the resistance changes. Connect VCC to an outer pin, GND to the other"
    Which pin is the outer pin for the VCC and the GND? Is it pin 1 for VCC and pin 3 for GND?

  • BenPhelps / about 13 years ago / 2

    These are much better for the Arduino as they cover the 0-1023 range evenly unlike the non-linear(Taper) version.

    • I agree. Even if you do want logarithmic control, you can do it programmatically as the Arduino math library has the log() function.

  • cdrttn / about 10 years ago / 1

    Pot works well and seems pretty sturdy. Pairs well with knobs like this.

  • Anyone know what part to use (in the SFE Eagle library) for this pot?

    • Member #218905 / about 11 years ago / 5

      Grab and load the SparkFun-built eagle library...http://www.opencircuits.com/SFE_Footprint_Library_Eagle.
      Add the "Spark Fun" >> "POT" >> "POT" part (ALPS POT). That's it. Hat's off to SparkFun for creating a library with most of the parts they sell in it. Top notch stuff.

    • Member #218905 / about 11 years ago / 1

      Good question...I'm searching for that now.

  • Member #153815 / about 12 years ago / 1

    Can these pots handle .25 watts of power draw on them?

    • Tenyu / about 11 years ago / 1

      I don't think they can... at least not for continuous use. The datasheet specifies a power rating of 0.05 W.

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