Rotary Switch - 10 Position

This is a single pole, 10 position rotary switch able to select up to 10 different states in a durable package. Unlike our other rotary switch, this model is much more robust and capable of handling larger currents and voltages. You may find this rotary switch familiar, it’s the same one we trusted in our Decade Resistance Box!

With a max voltage rating of 125VAC at 0.3A and a dielectric strength of 250VAC for 1 minute this is a serious little rotary switch capable of working with some of your bigger projects. Though this switch requires you to use 11 pins and is not breadboard friendly we do offer a breakout board (found in the Recommended Products section below) to provide easier access to its capabilities.

  • 1x Rotary Switch - 10 Position
  • 1x Hex Nut
  • 2x Washer
  • Rating: 0.3A/125VAC
  • Contact Resistance: 50mΩ max
  • Insulation Resistance: 100MΩ @ 500VDC min
  • Dielectric Strength: 250VAC for 1 minute
  • Rotation torque: 1.0+0.5KG/cm
  • Shaft: 3/8"

Rotary Switch - 10 Position Product Help and Resources

Rotary Switch Potentiometer Hookup Guide

April 30, 2015

How to use the Rotary Switch Potentiometer breakout board, with some sample applications.

Decade Resistance Box Hookup Guide

December 4, 2014

How to assemble the decade resistance box, then use it as a design and measurement tool.

Core Skill: Soldering

This skill defines how difficult the soldering is on a particular product. It might be a couple simple solder joints, or require special reflow tools.

1 Soldering

Skill Level: Noob - Some basic soldering is required, but it is limited to a just a few pins, basic through-hole soldering, and couple (if any) polarized components. A basic soldering iron is all you should need.
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Customer Comments

  • You are wrong with shaft diameter in “features” section for this thing, guys.

    Both datasheet and my caliper shows 6.35mm, which is corresponding to 0.25". So, many knobs on your list are compatible.

  • Can the rotation stop be moved to reduce the number of positions?

    I need a 4 position switch and an 8 position switch and I don’t like the idea of just leaving dead positions.

  • I am wondering if this would be a good choice of switch for a custom truck horn setup I want to build, I am going to order a sound board and speaker and all the other parts but want to wire it up so the switch chooses the sound bite and the steering wheel horn is the activator Will I be able to do that with this switch?

    Thanks

  • Somebody has to ask…. When will you have these that go to 11?

  • Do you folks have a knob that fits this?

  • Is a MBB (make before brake) version available?

  • What is the difference in meaning between “insulation resistance” and “dielectric strength”? They sound like synonyms.

  • is the base board in the last image included? if not where can i buy one?

  • Can these be turned continuously (like from 10 directly to 1) or do they have a stop, so that you have to turn it backwards to get back to 1 from 10?

    • They have a stop. If you were determined, you could defeat it - it’s just a little metal tab that hits the stop. With some tiny needlenose pliers, you could bend the tab out, and have free rotation.

      The switch frame itself has 12 positions - one every 30 degrees. Since these are 10 position switches, 2 of the positions aren’t populated. If you did defeat the stopper tab, you’d have 60° of rotation with no contact.

      • Thanks for the reply.. Interesting about the 2 extra positions.. Maybe the question from “dgerton” about creating one with “11” (and even 12!) would be possible!! :-)

        Might have to order a couple of these just to play with.. I see an arduino based combination lock in my future.. :-)

  • This is great! Presumably the knobs in the recommended section fit onto this switch? (The 15X19mm - COM-09998).

  • Awesome! Glad you guys are carrying these by themselves! Any idea what the life expectancy of these things are?

    • We just updated the datasheet with a more detailed one. Refer to section 5.

      They’re rated to stay in spec after 10,000 cycles, while carrying 0.3A of 125VAC.

      • Which datasheet is correct? The one in the Documents section says it is a make before break, while the one linked to in your comment says it is break before make. make before break would certainly be the right type to use in a resistance decade box.

        • I seem to have confused myself with links to datasheets. Please disregard the link in my last post.

          The seven-page one linked in the product description is correct. We purchase Taiwan Alpha part # SR2512F-0110-16F2B-C9-S .

          The “-S” in the part number stands for “shorting” timing, AKA make-before-break.

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