Raspberry Pi 3 B+

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Everyone knows and loves the Raspberry Pi, but what if the wireless capabilities only got better? The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ is here to provide you with the same Pi as before, but now with gigabit and PoE capable Ethernet, as well as better overheating protection for the 64-bit processor. The credit-card-sized computer is capable of many of the things your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word processing and playing high-definition video and games. It can run several flavors of Linux (and even Windows 10 free-of-charge) and is being used to teach kids all over the world how to program… Oh yeah, and it does all that for about $40.

The secret sauce that makes this computer so small and powerful is the Broadcom BCM2837, an ARM Cortex-A53 64-bit Quad Core Processor System-on-Chip operating at 1.4GHz. The GPU provides OpenGL ES 2.0, hardware-accelerated OpenVG and 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode. It is capable of 1Gpixel/s, 1.5Gtexel/s or 24 GFLOPs of general-purpose compute. What does that all mean? It means that if you plug the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ into your HDTV, you could watch Blu-ray quality video, using H.264 at 40MBits/s.

The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ has four built-in USB ports that provide enough connectivity for a mouse, keyboard or anything else that you feel the RPi needs. But if you want to add even more, you can still use a USB hub. Keep in mind, it is recommended that you use a powered hub so as not to overtax the onboard voltage regulator. Powering the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ is easy: just plug any 5V/2.5A USB power supply into the microUSB port. There’s no power button, so the RPi will begin to boot as soon as power is applied. To turn it off, simply shut down the Pi 3 B+, then remove power. The four built-in USB ports can even output up to 1.2A, enabling you to connect more power-hungry USB devices.

On top of all that, the low-level peripherals on the RPi make it great for hardware hacking. The 0.1" spaced 40-pin GPIO header on the RPi gives you access to 27 GPIO, UART, I2C, SPI, as well as 3.3 and 5V sources. Each pin on the GPIO header is identical to its predecessor, the Model 3. If you are planning to run a NOOBS card with the RPi3 B+ make sure that it is up to date with the latest version!

Note: Due to the impressive demand for the Raspberry Pi 3 B+, we are implementing a five unit per order max limit for the Model B+ until orders balance out a little. Please contact customer service if you have any questions with placing your order.

  • Broadcom BCM2837B0 64-bit ARM Cortex-A53 Quad Core Processor SoC running @ 1.4GHz
  • 1GB RAM LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • 4x USB2.0 Ports with up to 1.2A output
  • Extended 40-pin GPIO Header
  • Video/Audio Out via 4-pole 3.5mm connector, HDMI, CSI camera, or Raw LCD (DSI)
  • Storage: microSD
  • Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0 (maximum throughput 300Mbps)
  • 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11.b/g/n/ac wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2, BLE
  • H.264, MPEG-4 decode (1080p30); H.264 encode (1080p30); OpenGL ES 1.1, 2.0 graphics
  • Low-Level Peripherals:
    • 27x GPIO
    • UART
    • I2C bus
    • SPI bus with two chip selects
    • +3.3V
    • +5V
    • Ground
  • Power Requirements: 5V @ 2.5A via microUSB power source
  • Supports Raspbian, Windows 10 IoT Core, OpenELEC, OSMC, Pidora, Arch Linux, RISC OS and More!
  • 85mm x 56mm x 17mm

Raspberry Pi 3 B+ Product Help and Resources

Setting up a Raspberry Pi 3 as an Access Point

April 23, 2018

This guide will show you how to configure a Raspberry Pi as an access point and connect it to your local Ethernet network to share Internet to other WiFi devices.

Headless Raspberry Pi Setup

April 23, 2018

Configure a Raspberry Pi without a keyboard, mouse, or monitor.

Raspberry Pi 3 Starter Kit Hookup Guide

April 11, 2016

Guide for getting going with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ starter kit.
New!

Python Programming Tutorial: Getting Started with the Raspberry Pi

June 27, 2018

This guide will show you how to write programs on your Raspberry Pi using Python to control hardware.
New!

How to Use Remote Desktop on the Raspberry Pi with VNC

July 9, 2018

Use RealVNC to connect to your Raspberry Pi to control the graphical desktop remotely across the network.

Raspberry Pi 3 B+ not booting/Rainbow screen?

You will need to install a fresh/new Raspbian distribution (posted after 3/13/18) to your SD card. If you want to swap the SD card from your (previous generation) Raspberry Pi directly into the new Raspberry Pi 3B+, according to the Raspberry Pi forum page you will need to upgrade it first, but I have yet to get that working.

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade

RetroPie stock SD Image not working?

As of March 16th 2018, the RetroPie SD image hasn’t been updated for the new Raspbian distribution that was released for the Raspberry Pi 3B+. You will need to manually install RetroPie on a fresh/new Rasobian Stretch distribution. You will not be able to use the provided RetroPie SD image (from their download page) until it is updated.


Core Skill: Programming

If a board needs code or communicates somehow, you're going to need to know how to program or interface with it. The programming skill is all about communication and code.

3 Programming

Skill Level: Competent - The toolchain for programming is a bit more complex and will examples may not be explicitly provided for you. You will be required to have a fundamental knowledge of programming and be required to provide your own code. You may need to modify existing libraries or code to work with your specific hardware. Sensor and hardware interfaces will be SPI or I2C.
See all skill levels


Core Skill: Electrical Prototyping

If it requires power, you need to know how much, what all the pins do, and how to hook it up. You may need to reference datasheets, schematics, and know the ins and outs of electronics.

2 Electrical Prototyping

Skill Level: Rookie - You may be required to know a bit more about the component, such as orientation, or how to hook it up, in addition to power requirements. You will need to understand polarized components.
See all skill levels


Customer Comments

  • Most of the other distributors listed on RaspberryPi.org are sticking to the $35 price. Why is SparkFun charging the extra $4.95?

  • This is a very nice revision to the pi 3, with a small bump in processor performance. I’d add to the description that while the Ethernet hardware supports 1Gbit, throughput is effectively limited to ~200-330Mbit by the USB 2.0 bus. Still, that’s up to 3x the Raspberry pi 3. (USB 3.x in a hypothetical future model would help, but apparently doesn’t yet fit into the $35 BoM.)

    Wi-Fi adds 5GHz band, and this new version is also an FCC-compliant radio module, making it easier to commercialize your pi-based project!

    More nerdy discussion here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-3-model-bplus-sale-now-35/

  • Got my new Pi 3 B+ and have found that it will not boot with Raspian stretch, even the newest release. It also will not boot Windows 10 IOT. What did work was Raspian Noobs. Of note is the faster boot time and faster web loading. I have not messed with configuring I2c or SP1 or Uart.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5

Based on 15 ratings:

Currently viewing all customer reviews.

1 of 1 found this helpful:

Beautiful little machine, a little memory constrained

Very nice little machine. The usual super easy set-up and install via Raspbian. Really nice default desktop setup.

Too many tabs open in Chromium browser will cause out of memory (OOM) killer.

Linux+wifi works well. Not all the hardcore tools are supported on the BRCM wifi chipset. But was able to plug in a USB wifi that supported the modes I needed.

Continuing to tinker with it.

Fast, reliable, and power efficient

I’m using this Pi with great success to replace my home linux server/router/firewall. Pretty easy to setup with the lightweight Raspbian distro, and TP Link USB Gigabit Ethernet adapters work well in addition to the built-in Ethernet port. Very low latency, but I believe it’s performance is limited to around 300 Mbps due to USB 2.0, so this works well for most internet connections but I’d want something else if I got gigabit.

The newest Pi

Have finally gotten my hands on a Pi 3+. Board looks like the Pi 3 but with double sided components. It retains the 40 pin GPIO, camera and display connections. I found that it will not boot Raspian stretch, nor Windows 10 IOT. Raspian Noobs works well however. I suspect that Stretch just has not been updated to the new Broadcom processor so it should work in the future. I have not had a chance to work with any of the interfaces but would expect it to be pretty much like its predecessor

Amazing device

As with all of the Pi’s, the B+ works flawlessly.

Suprisingly powerful PC on a chip

Once I cleared the download Rasperian and install OS hurdle, the Pi is fantastic. I would highly recommend getting the PI with WiFi built in, just saves a headache of network cables. The OS is pretty slick, I wasn’t expecting a Windows Like visual interface, very impressive.

Much better than the standard pi3

New dual band WiFi is much nicer, and the performance is much better. Currently running as a server for vehicle performance analysis.

I received the RPi 3 B+ in a timely manner as promised. Your website tells the status of the order, every step of the way. I could even track the shipping by beginning at your button.

Another Great Pi

I own the Pi 1 B, Pi 3 B, Pi Zero, Pi Zero W, and now this Pi 3 B+. This is easily the most performant Raspberry Pi to date. I haven’t put this through all of its paces, but out of the box it boots right up with a power supply and SD card. I also got a clear case from Sparkfun, which to me is the best Pi case on the market.

A necessary upgrade from the Pi3B

I’m a big fan of this for a few reasons. 1: 1.4 GHz processor. There’s many times where I’m running something and I wish there was a little more overhead. Or I notice a little lagging during high processing applications. 2: Built in b/g/n/ac wifi, and 4.2 BLE. DOWNSIDE, bluetooth uses the I2C bus. So if you want to use I2C you have to disable bluetooth or use the alternative pins that comes with a few caveats. 3. Ethernet now “Gigabit” cough 300Mbps. For me this is one device I always like to have an extra laying around. The best use I have found is for my 3D printer. I noticed lagging and problems with the video and g-code processing with Pi3B. The Pi3B+ has shown no issues. The only downside where a beaglebone or arduino still shines is the connectivity with SPI/I2C. Pi has focused more on the micro-computing in recent boards.

Excelent

Now these day i become easy to build project

Amazing piece of electronics

Small, powerful, simple, with unlimited possibilities on its gpio interface.

As expected - Organized support would be nice

The Pi 3 b+ itself was without surprises. I already have most of the stuff in the “kit”, but did shop for Pi 3B specific support items. All the Pi stuff is lumped together, and if you try to order the IoT book by itself you are sent to the publisher’s web site, NOT SparkFun’s.

SparkFun has SO MANY shields, adapters, & break-out boards it can take a while to find what you want. If you know hardware in general (I do) you can adapt a GPIO pin (for example) to just about anything. If you want to find direct connect stuff that plugs and connects correctly to specifically the Pi expansion header it can be a challenge to filter out all the other stuff.

How about a (regularly updated) matrix with single board micros along one axis, all the moderately general purpose IO boards along the other, and a small note at the intersection for “Plugs & Plays”, etc.

Satisfied with the results

Without having carried out an exhaustive test the RPi is fulfilling the expectations. Raises a little more temperature than the previous model but without exceeding. One of the RPi is dedicated to streaming video and the other to intensive use. Sorry I can not give you more data.

Octoprint

I configured my Pi to run Octoprint controlling my Lulzbot Taz6 3D printer. Slotted in a 16GB SD card and power supply from Sparkfun. Printed a sick case for it. Had to drill out the mounting holes by a blonde one to get my M3_.50x16 screws to fit. Haven’t tried the wireless ethernet as I’m hardwired. HDMI port works well too. It acceped my keyboards and mice no problem too. I’ll be adding a webcam shortly. Looking at the usage percentages of the hardware I don’t think I have tapped more than a percentage of the Pi’s power.