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Description: This is a force sensitive resistor with a round, 0.5" diameter, sensing area. This FSR will vary its resistance depending on how much pressure is being applied to the sensing area. The harder the force, the lower the resistance. When no pressure is being applied to the FSR its resistance will be larger than 1MΩ. This FSR can sense applied force anywhere in the range of 100g-10kg.

Two pins extend from the bottom of the sensor with 0.1" pitch making it bread board friendly. There is a peel-and-stick rubber backing on the other side of the sensing area to mount the FSR.

These sensors are simple to set up and great for sensing pressure, but they aren't incredibly accurate. Use them to sense if it's being squeezed, but you may not want to use it as a scale.

Dimensions:

  • Overall length: 2.375"
  • Overall width: 0.75"
  • Sensing diameter: 0.5"

Documents:

Comments 27 comments

  • I have a Doepfer CTM64. It has 64 contacts and a common, and when the circuits are joined by a momentary switch, pressing the switch (closing the circuit) sends a Midi note-on message. I’d like to make a momentaryswitch which has as little tactile feedback as possible (I don’t want it to ‘click’ when I press it). Would it be possible to use the force sensing resistor as a momentary switch?

    • You should be able to do something like that using a force sensor like this and a 555-timer as shown here: http://www.zen22142.zen.co.uk/Circuits/Switching/debounce.htm

      If you want to reduce component count and increase the number of sensors you can use then you could use an Arduino instead.

  • excuse me i wanna ask someting how the steps if we want to order this Force Sensitive Resistor 0.5"? thank you

  • Hey I just want to confirm that this makes sense. I’d like to measure the intensity of pinching a small (squishy, cast rubber) object. Doesn’t need to be accurate, just not digital (ie range from 0-10 vs 0/1). You’d still be able to get a reading from being placed inside a small object depending on the force applied and amount of quality of material correct?

  • Hi Is it possible to change the range from the written 100g-10kg to perhaps 1kg-100kg in some way? I want to put the sensor in a shoe, and therefore I need to read a much higher force than 100g-10kg.

    Best regards - Kasper

    • Sadly, no. This is a function of the material property itself-not an adjustable setting. You could try using several sensors together, or instead use something like the load cell.

      • Hi Tony, similar question but slightly different application. I’d like to put this, or something like this, in a shoe, just to act as a switch so I can tell when the foot is on the ground vs. midair. Would it work for this application or will the sensor break under someones body weight?

        • If you are using it for a full-grown adult, you probably don’t want to use this sensor in a shoe, as the max weight is only 10kg, which is higher than the pressure that could be expected from a full-grown adult’s leg. You could just go with a capacitive sensor or a basic switch if you are simply looking to see if their foot is on the ground or in midair. Capacitive sensors would allow you to read the changes a bit more, giving you a wider range of readings than a basic switch would.

      • Thank you Toni for your reply. Thats too bad. I think the load cell would be to big. Perhaps I could use this: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/8685 - i read that you could change the resistor to make it work up to 1000N. Do you think that would work?

        • That may work better, but again, this will limit out around 100 lbs of pressure. If you are trying to weigh more than that, you might want to consider a mesh network of sensors with the load balanced on all of them to be able to get a larger range of values.

  • hello, i am about to create a device with FSR and Arduino to measure ball kicking impact force, where the FSR will be place at the suitable contact area. as i read in several article said that this sensor varies with contact area and contact time. i am having difficulty to calibrate this sensor dynamically. hope i can get any suggestion from you guys here. tq

  • I read on this site (http://www.tekscan.com/flexible-force-sensors , under specs, marked with the *** near the bottom) that the force range can be extended depending on how its wired up, does this apply for these sensors as well?

  • I’ve read that these sensors can be damaged if pressure is applied for long periods of time. Has anyone encountered this problem? I intend to average three sensor values to measure the rough liquid level in a tank. The tank may sit on the sensors for periods of time up to a month with varying levels of liquid.

  • I believe this is the datasheet.

  • Hey guys- So I’m looking for a way to wire these up… I don’t want to risk melting it by soldering directly to it. I found a pic here (http://www.ladyada.net/images/sensors/fsrhead.jpg) with a header on it. Does anyone know where I can find something like that?

    Right now I have it jammed into a breadboard which is functional but not sexy or convenient.

    • I don’t think soldering it would hurt if you’re quick about it – much like any other plastic electronic component.

  • I’m kind of new to electronics and I want to make some light up shoes, but I just don’t know what sensor to get for them! I was thinking this might work, but I don’t know. Any advice on what I should get?
    Anything would be greatly appreciated :-)

  • When I apply static load to this sensor, resistance starts from some value and than slowly drifts down to the zero. It can take 5 to 10 minutes, but it will eventually go from 100,000 KOhm to 1 KOhm.

    What is wrong, shouldn’t it settle at one value?

  • “This FSR can sense applied force anywhere in the range of 100g-10kg."
    Not to be a physics geek, but in this case, this should read:
    "This FSR can sense applied force anywhere in the range of 0.981N-98N."
    Force is measured in Newtons, mass in Kilograms.

  • Hi
    I’m thinking about using this kind of sensors “underwater”, after having isolated the parts where the pins are connected to cables. Would the pad work underwater? I’m not looking for precision, just for a signal when pressure in the water changes.

    • Did you do this and what was the response? I want to use one in water to sense water pressure . I was told that I could immerse the whole thing , circuit board too , in a sealed oil filled container and it would work but I hav'nt done that yet

  • If I was after the sum of pressure on multiple sensors, could I get away with putting them in series and using only one analog pin to read them?

  • I’m hoping to use this to detect the presence of a shot glass in a liquor dispensing robot, lol. If all goes well I’ll report back.

    • These things are great!
      Word of advice, however:
      Don’t… spill… water (liquor)… on… it.
      liquids will get trapped in the pad and wildly change the electrical response (duh.)
      I ended up turning my $7 sensor into a $7 push-button. But I can tell you that as long as you keep ‘em dry, they’re pretty great!

      • Hey N.Poole. I know this was years ago- but do you have a good code to use this force sensor as merely a switch on/off?

  • These work surprisingly well.

  • I use them to build a drumpad, and they are very nice. After calibration, i have some good velocity sensitive pads!
    i’m happy :)


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