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Description: Ever wonder what goes on inside these things? Well this clear bread board might enlighten.

Beyond the clear plastic, this is really just a regular, solderless breadboard. It has 2 power buses, 30 columns, and 10 rows - a total of 400 tie in points. All pins are spaced by a standard 0.1". The two sets of five rows are separated by about 0.3", perfect for straddling a DIP package over. The board accepts wire sizes in the range of 29-20AWG.

This board also has a self-adhesive on the back. The boards also have interlocking parts, so you can hook as many together as you'd like.

Dimensions: 3.29 x 2.15 x 0.33" (83.5 x 54.5 x 8.5mm)

Comments 34 comments

  • I removed the adhesive foam tape on the back, replaced it with clear double-sided tape, stuck the board to a piece of acrylic, and added some LEDs.

    Now I have a lightup breadboard.

  • Now that’s just sexy.

  • A quick word of warning. It’s kinda tough to see small jumpers (esp. white ones) on this baby. Also, it’s a bad idea if you are planning on breadboarding any opticl sensor, because the clear nature of the breadboard will refract tons of light where you might not want it. It’s still really cool though.

  • These are very handy, also fun to have a transparent one. Thanks!

  • would be nice if it was white ..

  • My older students comment that it’s really hard to see small parts on both the clear and red breadboards. Tough to make sure component leads end up where you want them to go. Had at least one bad one in the batch of 20 that I bought, as well. Any chance for a traditional white one in this size?

  • The holes in this breadboard are very tight, which can frequently cause your wires to bend and jam when forcing them into the holes.

  • I didn’t look at the dimensions, so I expected a larger board. I love the board, and the fact the power bus separates allowing for more interlocking devices. I added 2 RGB leds like Paradoxial, and it fits my Teensy 3 better then I’d hoped!

  • In addition to the other negatives mentioned by many (really hard to see holes, etc.), these things smell terrible. They offgas some sort of awful and probably hazardous smell that’s very chemically, solventy and it actually fills the area you’re working in.

  • Great breadboard just a minor flaws, but im sure it was from my order, 1- some of the holes where covered in plastic

    like i said, a minor flaw with mine, but other than that it was an east fix and its been great!

  • For those trying to teach / learn with breadboarding, the free Pebble layout program might be handy. You can get it free from picaxe

    Note that it has no install program and no EXE, its all HTML in your browser. You just extract the files to a new directory, drag the shortcut to the desktop, edit the shortcut to point to your directory and then double click on the shorcut.

  • Yay, my clear bread board just came in. One issue the picture shows it having two power buses, even the description shows it having two. Mine unfortunately only has one. Another slight problem is the double sided sticky tape is what holds the contact clips in. This is my first bread board so I didn’t know what to expect. I guess I expected a little more than what I got. Oh well. Thanks Sparkfun, for helping me get my electronic toes wet.

  • I found it annoying that the power buses don’t line up with the rest of the columns. Neat board though, and I like how they can snap together.

    • I’m also annoyed by the lining up problem, but every breadboard I have has it. I suspect it’s standard.

  • I love this bread board i use this every day!!!

  • worst quality breadboard i have ever used

  • As others have said, these make it very hard to see what’s going on on top of the board, and they don’t help much with what’s going on inside. If you want to reveal how a breadboard works, just remove the paper or whatever that’s covering the bottom, and replace it with see-through packing tape. Looking at the back of the board, this makes it plain as day how rows are connected, etc. (Of course, this takes away the option of self-adhesive backing.) I’ve used this when teaching my class and I think it gets the point across without making the board unusable from the front.

  • One of these came with my Arduino starter kit and I find it difficult (for these ever growing older eyes) to see where the holes are because of all the visual noise underneath. The idea makes sense and is a good idea to show the layout of the metal strips inside but I much prefer to use one with opaque plastic especially the white variety in order to see the holes clearly.

  • What’s next…designer see-thru test equip? I think I will just keep using my old (now off white) board. Thanks anyway.

  • Would anyone recommend this for sticking to the Mega Arduino protoshield (http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9346)?

  • I really wish you guys carried an opaque board the same size as this one so that it still fits in the Arduino + breadboard holder. I find plain white boards much nicer to work with in less than ideal lighting conditions.

  • Meh. I got this to go with the “Arduino and Breadboard Holder”. It works okay for that, but some of the connections are really tight.
    Also, the power rows are staggered from the regular rows, so you can’t use this with a Bare Bones Board.

  • My 10-year-old son is interested in electronics so I purchased this hoping that it would help him understand how a breadboard works. We worked on several simple projects using it and it was very helpful at first but the poor quality quickly became evident. I agree with most of the comments made in the other negative reviews – especially annoying were the numerous loose connections when using standard 22 gauge jumper wires!<br />
    <br />
    In spite of the poor quality I still think it was worthwhile purchasing it for my son, but more as a teaching aid than as a functioning breadboard. It really did help him to understand how the connections are made, and once he understood that, he quickly began using it correctly. We still keep it around so he can explain things to his friends when they are experimenting but we no longer use it for breadboarding.

  • Any chance of getting these in brightly tinted colors or a simple way to dye the plastic?

  • The foam adhesive on the bottom covers the slots where you can connect these together, so I had to cut a little bit of the foam off. Also, the adhesive needs to by cut in order to remove the power buses.

  • Sorry, gotta agree with the last poster. Thought this looked cool but it’s pretty junky. The contacts are really inconsistent–tight in some places, loose in others. And I got the same warping. Don’t know who made this but the interlocking parts on the power sides, make it so they lock bending upwards.
    Plus, since its clear, I can see how badly it was constructed. Got it with the plastic already pretty stressed and fractured on the inside. Don’t see this one lasting very long.

    • Yeah, these are by far better quality:
      http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=112
      Except nine out of ten times (actual statistics may vary) the plastic legs fall off due to the adhesive on the rubber legs being lousy. I just put a dab of CA on each leg and it works fine now. Watch out for the split rail though. I cannot count how many times I’ve had a proto not work because of that thing.

  • My school bought 20 of these for use in a freshman electrical engineering class where I was the teaching assistant. We were hoping that these would help calm confusion as to how a breadboard works, and for the same price as the non-clear ones from Jameco, we thought they were a bargain.
    While certainly novel, they pretty well suck. They warp easily (permanently bow into a slight curve), the contacts become loose after far too little use and it didn’t really help anyone understand how they work. They are self-adhesive, but they don’t really function well without being stuck to something rigid. Without being stuck to something, the backing gets rather beat up and will come loose easily and the contact clips will pop loose.
    We just bought 50 more of the non-clear Jameco boards instead for the upcoming semester. They are a far more durable product and come with a metal bottom piece to use should you not want to stick it to something permanently.

    • yep……if you want quality you gotta pay the big bucks. I like those Jameco boards, that what I used as a freshman in college.
      Man, I dunno what college you’re TAing at, we had to buy our breadboards.

  • Two Thumbs down. Although it looks really cool, it it much more difficult to see the holes than with a colored bread board. 220 grit sandpaper took the gloss off of mine an made it usable.

  • Now that’s pretty cool. If only they sold them in larger sizes…


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