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Description: Sharp's GP2Y1010AU0F is an optical air quality sensor, designed to sense dust particles. An infrared emitting diode and a phototransistor are diagonally arranged into this device, to allow it to detect the reflected light of dust in air. It is especially effective in detecting very fine particles like cigarette smoke, and is commonly used in air purifier systems.

The sensor has a very low current consumption (20mA max, 11mA typical), and can be powered with up to 7VDC. The output of the sensor is an analog voltage proportional to the measured dust density, with a sensitivity of 0.5V/0.1mg/m3.

To interface with the sensor you need to connect to its 6-pin, 1.5mm pitch connector; we do have a mating connector for this.

Dimensions: 1.81 x 1.18 x 0.69" (46.0 × 30.0 × 17.6 mm)

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Comments 26 comments

  • I was interested in what the $12 Sharp sensor could do. I hooked it up to an Arduino Ethernet to post the data to Pachube Feed 55892. I compared it to a Dylos DC1100 Pro laser particle counter which I also connected to Pachube Feed 55522. Using data taken at the same time, I was able to “calibrate” it to read out in particles per 0.01 cubic feet. I was nicely surprised how well the two sensors agreed. I started putting documentation at: http://www.howmuchsnow.com/arduino/airquality/

    • On your website, you have a nice cable harness for the sensor. Did you build that, or did you buy that somewhere?

      EDIT. Never mind, I see the link on your site now.

      Here is the link if anyone is interested:

      http://www.digikey.com/catalog/en/partgroup/single-ended-socket-cable-assemblies/10343

  • we used it in our “conscious clothing” project (see video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPvyIXdkc4g), we calibrated it with a $5100 Thermo Scientific 1500, and within it’s range of sensitivity found it to correlate remarkably well. we’ve yet to do serious “in the oven” controlled experiments but hopefully will be doing so soon. it reacts much quicker than the 1500, but that is because the 1500 has a vortex filter so you can select the particle size. it makes false readings when jolted, but with an accelerometer we can filter that out.

  • Does anyone else feel this belongs in either the ‘weather’ or ‘light / imaging’ category? How is this relevant to biometrics?

    • I apologize for the extremely late response on this, but for anyone else curious, I’m guessing the thought process for listing this in biometrics was for customers looking to build air purification systems for asthma or allergy sufferers, or for a breath analyzer.

  • Very much a newbie here. I have this sensor and just ordered the corresponding cable. I also have an Arduino Uno my friend lent to me. Will this work? Or does it have to be ethernet? If it works this way I’d like to try it before connecting it to the internet and just connect directly to the laptop.

    Seems to be all the same people working with this on all of the sites I have come across. Let’s keep improving this stuff together.

  • Would this work inside of a vacuum cleaner, to detect when it sucks up dust? A reply would be very welcome, thanks!

  • Is there any wiring example for this device? Please send me if there is at vedran@nardev.org

  • I’m looking for a second-hand smoke detector / sensor. If anyone knows whether this sensor is good for this purpose or knows any other sensors please let me know.

    • I’m not sure how it would differentiate between first and second hand but I’d say, yes, this sensor would respond to cigarette smoke. I have used it in an indoor air quality sensor pacman and it performs quite well. Now, there are others too that might be easier to interface with your system. This one is a little tricky in that it requires a “timed trigger” kind of approach (trigger on, wait Xms, read, trigger off) that can complicate the troubleshooting a little and others like the Grove Dust are easier and measure basically the same thing.

      Check Chris Nafis' site where he’s tried this and other sensors and his kickstarter project

  • How practical would it be to use this to detect smoke (like, as part of a fire protection system)? The datasheet recommends that I don’t use it for this, but do they mean that in a “this device is incapable of detecting smoke from a fire” way, or in a “don’t let your life depend on this device” way?

  • Hi–any idea whether this sensor could be used to measure sky visibility from 0 to 10 miles for aviation applications? Or is the sensor not sensitive enough?

  • Great product for the dust-afflicted or gotta-have-it-sensor-freaks (me too). Pity about the mounting, cable, connector and crimping issues - maybe SparkFun could offer this on a breakout board with a ½" cable to suit? I’ll take two at $19.95 each……

  • Can this be placed in water to measure the turbidity?

    • This device is not water proof. Its internal electrical components would be exposed to water, potentially causing breakage.

      • Also, even if you managed to make water pass through the sensing area, the light path has been designed for air, the refraction of the light through water will mean that there is not only scattering and the response of the sensor would be undetermined.

    • No, this is an air sensor and has corrosive parts.

  • Any ideas on how to mount this thing? There are no convenient holes or flanges…

    • You can use hot glue or velcro.

    • What I did was to remove the cover, lift the electronics/optics block and then drill a couple of holes on the back of it … will try to find images.
      However, the sensor itself is pretty light so double sided tape might work for some cases.

  • Has anyone had any success using this component?
    After dealing with the tiny connector I have it on a breadboard according to the “example” diagram in the datasheet but I can’t get it to respond to changing “smokiness” … I get just noise between 0 and 500mV.
    Any help will be greatly appreciated.

  • I guess I’ll have to test this out.

  • Perfect timing guys. I Heart Robotics has an article on building your own clean room and one of the things they were missing was a dust particle detector.
    http://www.iheartrobotics.com/2010/02/this-new-lab-diy-cleanroom.html (credit to http://www.hackaday.com)

    • Thank you for this, I was wondering if there was something I could do w/ it & you gave me the perfect project.


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