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Description: High quality switching 'wall wart' AC to DC 9V 650mA wall power supply manufactured specifically for Spark Fun Electronics. These are switch mode power supplies which mean the output is regulated to 9V (no more 14V outputs!) and the capable output current is much higher (650mA!).

These will power most projects that don't require more than 650mA of current. Center-positive 5.5x2.1mm barrel connector.

Works with 100-240VAC inputs.

Check out our Unregulated Power Supply Tutorial

Comments 26 comments

  • Does this work with Arduino 2009 or fries it?

  • Be careful with what outlets you plug it into. The prongs can be pulled out if the outlet applies too much pressure. The retail version I purchased from Micro Center last weekend ended up this way.

    • Ditto, and the metal pin was left in the socket. One of the few times I’ve intentionally had to test the insulation on my pliers.

    • Yep, mine did the same thing. Except mine actually cracked the whole faceplate in a couple places as well.
      Reattached the prong, and still had to throw away adapter… put out 9V and seemed to short whenever a load was applied lol.
      Still, the price is pretty hard to beat..

  • European plug please!!!

  • I bought it, and finally tested it. Found out the unit is cracked. The screw isn’t holding it together, but it just lightly is snapped in. Won’t buy this anymore. The one from Amazon was same price, no issues!

  • These make the best guitar pedal adapters! They take up one plug slot (very convenient) and they put out very clean voltage. If you play electric guitar I would recommend to buy a handful of these. Before you use them, remember to reverse the wires because you need negative tip with pedals. It takes 5 minutes to remove the cover and switch the wires, then you are good to go.

  • Are the “guts” available just as a circuit board (populated), preferably with some mounting holes? If not, suggestions on where to buy something similar, or maybe make the schematic available? I’d like to use it as part of an embedded system.

  • Is it possible to order this with a longer cord? The length works for what I need sometimes, but I could use a couple extra feet for some of the powered chairs I use these on.

  • Man, I love you guys at Sparkfun. I really love the Phillips head screw and easy access tabs! It’s also great that you don’t squirt these things full of silicone or glue or whatever crap most have in them.

  • After a 3.3V voltage regulator, can I safely run this at a higher current? Say at 1A?

    • Depending on the regulator: if it is a linear regulator (and it probably is) then no, the maximum output would be about 650mA. What a linear regulator does if to act as a series resistor, dropping 9-3.3V which equals 5.7V as heat. You might have used a resistor to drop the voltage going into an LED, tis works almost the same.
      The difference between a regulator and a resistor, in this aspect, is that a regulator knows the current flowing and adjusts itself to compensate the difference. So basically is behaves like a smart resistor that adjusts it’s resistance based on the current flowing through it.

  • What is the configuration of the barrel connector? polarity/hot/etc? Is there a manual or schematic blow up?

  • Could I use this to power an Arduino?

  • This is not UL listed or CSA approved. Might be important if you need something that is.
    Does anyone know where I can find a safety-certified version of a 9V >500mA adapter?

  • And by three ‘pins’ I meant “prongs” … you know, the ones that go in the wall socket. Connect negative to ground, so your arduino gets a true ground instead of a floating one.

  • If you could make one that has three pins, so the negative output is connected to ground, that would be awesome. Right now I’m having issues with some sensors because I don’t have a true ground on my arduino… Of course I discovered these problems only when I disconnect USB (which has true ground, through my laptop power supply) and connect this power adapter.

    • Try a 10K pull-down resistor to ground, might help stabilize the sensors by blocking some of the floaty-ness. :)

    • That seems strange that your project isn’t working with a floating ground. What kind of sensors are you using?
      If you really need a true ground, just connect a ground pin on your Arduino to ground directly. You don’t need the power supply to do it for you.

  • Does this plug work in Europe? The pins look different from what I’m used to.

    • Yes it does (works at 220V), but you’ll need a plug adaptor to fit your sockets.


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