Join us today for SparkFun Live - The Tweeting Turkey Temperature Timer

We'll show you how to make your project tweet!

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On today's episode of SparkFun Live, we're going to build the tweeting turkey temperature timer! The goal of this project is not necessarily to have you build your own turkey timer, but rather to show you how you can use the new Intel Edison to connect your project with Twitter! The episode starts at 3 p.m. MST. You can find the stream here:

This demo will showcase how to automatically tweet temperature data using the Intel Edison. We will be going over Ubilinux, which is a Linux distribution based on Debian "Wheezy" and will be using python wrapper Twython. Note that while the Edison documentation uses Yocto, we chose to load Ubilinux onto the board instead!

For the purposes of the demo, we created a special Twitter account which you can find here. Hope you'll join us at 3!


Comments 4 comments

  • Once again, "Good grief!"

    Check out this article on The Register regarding a Kitchen Thermometer that will talk to your smart phone.

    Makes me glad I'm still using a flip-phone that is smart enough to be able to make phone calls!

  • At the risk of sounding like a certain cartoon character, "Good grief!"

    Although Tweeting some temperatures may be a good thing, IMHO, trying to use it for cooking is the sort of thing that makes us "old fogies" think of Twitter/Facebook/et al as ANTI-social media.

    Better idea: Most cell phone providers have a way of sending an e-mail as a txt msg to your cell phone. So why not just send your phone a text message when your turkey is nearing completion of the bake time? (Set the "how near" based on how far you expect to be away from it -- if you're going to be at home, then it can be the target temperature. If you're going to be out shopping, maybe when it's within 10 degrees, and if you're going to be chatting at the neighbors, maybe 5 degrees. Oh, yeah, I just remembered, the "social media" crowd doesn't believe in doing things in person. Oh well...)

    • Starting off with "good grief", made me read this comment as if Charlie Brown was saying it. hahah I totally agree with your comment. :)

      When making this demo, the first thing I did was send a text to my smartphone without twitter. This specific project was more holiday themed then anything and is meant to be a silly. Why Edison and Twitter? The great thing when working with the Edison, projects like these are fast and simple after setup. Mostly due to the fact, the Edison being a single-board computer, I can use a lot of APIs already out there.

      When doing this type of project, you can use social media to create more of open interactions with anyone who wants (or cares) to follow your app. Want classrooms/friends, all over the world, to control a robot through hashtags, you can. (Not to say you can't other ways) With the Python wrapper Twython, you can do more advance things, like making something happen when a specific Tweet occurs, which is what Shawn did in the Raspberry Pi Twitter Monitor.

      This project was also to showcase using ubilinux vs Yocto. Yocto linux is a prebuilt distribution for the Edison, which has a limited package manager, and is generally intended to be customized and reflashed. Ubilinux is based on Debian Wheezy, and is much more similar to what you'd find on something like the Raspberry Pi, and leverages Apt for package management.

      Hopefully, that gives a little more insight on this demo that was more for showcasing the tools/resources for this hardware. :D

    • I guess you missed this part:

      The goal of this project is not necessarily to have you build your own turkey timer, but rather to show you how you can use the new Intel Edison to connect your project with Twitter!

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