Roberto Marquez is joining us for three weeks to work on polishing and beefing up his DIY MP3 player!

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SparkFun welcomes yet another Pete into the fold - meet Pete Marchetto, hacker extraordinaire.

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Our newest hacker team is working remotely with us from Amsterdam to make a group-played instrument.

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Brendan joins us from a high-end lighting studio in NYC to work on an experimental dimmer.

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Carlos is joining us all the way from Brazil to work on a new way to make music!

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We have a new friend! His name is Matthew Burmeister, and he loves the weather. We also have some updates on our past hackers!

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Julián is joining us from Argentina, to work on adding SparkFun parts to his miniBloq programming environment!

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New hacker-in-residence Josh Datko is joining us to work with the BeagleBone Black on internet privacy!

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John Gillespie joins us from Texas for two weeks of hackery!

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We're excited to introduce you to our latest hackers-in-residence: Sophi Kravitz and Shane Clements!

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Check out this "how-to" from our Hackers in Residence

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We're kicking off a trial run of an in-house hackers-in-residence program with Sean Bonner and Tara Tiger Brown!

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Recent Blog Comments

I’d love to see and hear this in action.
And no. I traded the breadboards for ribbon cable once it all went inside. There is precious little space inside the visor.
Coming right up, DK!
First, I only bash Buzzard, er, Eagle, because it so richly deserves to be bashed. (I’ve used what I consider to be far better products that…
>“I can’t go within 500 feet of Skywalker Ranch because of some remarks I made in 1999” I’ll admit that I only saw the original *Star…
I would be curious to see the final project mounted in the helmet. You didn’t keep it on the breadboards did you? This is where a small…
I agree. The basic schematic part symbols look very descriptive of their corresponding parts: a capacitor symbol looks like two parallel…
The zig-zag symbol is the ANSI (US) style, and the open rectangle symbol is the IEC (International) style. See…
Great feedback, as always :) Good point on the scientific notion. I assumed it would be understood, but I don’t think I learned about it…
First, thanks for showing the number of electrons needed for an Ampere of current, but you really don’t need to know “scientific notation”…

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