Another Introduction to Arduino Class


Our first Introduction to Arduino class sold out in record time - so we decided it would be a good idea to add a second date. If you're looking to get started in electronics, or maybe just want to explore the Arduino platform, this is absolutely the class for you. Check it out - the Introduction to Arduino Class, taking place on April 30th, 2011.


You'll leave the class with your very own SparkFun Inventor's Kit for Arduino.

This class focuses on the increasingly-popular SparkFun Inventor's Kit for Arduino and will guide you through experiments of varying degrees of difficulty as you learn all about inputs, outputs, sensors, and working within the frame of the Arduino development platform.


In this class, you'll explore the power of the Arduino Uno.

This class is a great way to get started in the wonderful world of embedded electronics and is hosted by a group of SparkFun experts who can answer all your Arduino-based questions. Space is limited and this class seems to be a popular one, so sign up now if you want to attend!


Comments 25 comments

  • A classroom environment is rarely ideal for this sort of learning. In a classroom, some students will know more than others but they are all being taught approximately the same material. The less knowledgeable students drag down the more knowledgeable students. The more knowledgeable students make the less knowledgeable students feel inadequate. Classroom learning is comparable to communism. The poor are pushed too hard and the rich are dragged down.

    The best way to learn about electronics is to pick up some internet. Browse Wikipedia. Look through examples. Google what you don’t know.

    • that being said, our classes are wildly popular.

    • From my experience, the major benefit to hands-on instruction at Sparkfun is the Sparkfun people in the room. If you have any kind of electronics question, even if it’s not directly related to the lab, you have a channel to get them answered in fairly rapid succession.
      I’ve also liked the confirmation that “yes, that’s right” or “nope, try again” when doing new stuff. Surface mount soldering class and also their solder-pasted and stenciling class was good for that. Pretty tough to get that kind of feedback in any other format.

    • thats the same way i’ve learned my first two programming lauguages-in a period of three months!
      EDIT- but I would still LOVE to take a class. with people who know what i’m saying!

  • Yep, everyone should know that we have been dealing with this problem since we started our first class. We just want to do it right and eventually we will have something to offer everyone that can’t physically make it to the classes. But for the time being, classes will continue :-)

    • Fair enough. It’s just good to know you guys are working on it. Can’t wait to watch the classes from CA!

      • Well, get on a plane (SW has good fares) and come to Boulder. I am in the hotel right now tomorrow I will attend the class…

        • yeah but i’ve only got $12… not eve enough for the class! if i could afford to, i would in an instant!
          EDIT: $300 for a flight from dulles??? jeez, i’m not going anytime soon.
          hmm 1,000 would be 83 weeks of allowance

          • How about scholarships for high school students?

          • Same here! I think SparkFun should have classes in different states so that kids, and people that can’t fly out to Colorado, can attend…and maybe also have other AVC’s elsewhere (cough….East Coast…..cough)?? :)
            Sam

            • I’d love to see classes take place in other states, but it all comes down to money.
              Does SFE have enough to send teachers, equipment, rental of the place, etc.
              Personally, you’d be better off convincing a hackerspace to stream the class and everyone tries to follow along.

  • Okay. Getting to hang out with like minded folks and play with electronics is cool. getting (sorta)free stuff, yeah thats nice too. I think there are a lot of electronics clubs across the states if not the world that would be a great place to go if you want to connect and learn some things and are not in the area of SparkFun. But a class on arduino? If you really can’t figure it out on your own, maybe you should first focus on learning which end of the soldering iron to pick up… jk. But i’m sure out of those same clubs you could find some help with one of the simplest micro’s to learn yet. Surely. And flying out to CO? for this class? really?

    • Those clubs you’re talking about are mostly called hackerspaces. There are a ton of them throughout the world, mainly only in major cities.
      They aren’t “free” and sometimes require a membership - but have discounts for students.

  • There are pros and cons to classes and to online tutorial videos. It is nice to have an “expert” to talk to when things go wrong and you can’t figure out why, (e.g. “your LED is in backwards.”) Also, it is great to meet like-minded Arduinites.
    However, if you have the time, I agree with Nike on self-directed learning. Having gone through the tutorials in the SIK, I found them to be very well laid out and would highly recommend them to newcomers, even if you can’t make it to a class. You can learn a lot by delving deeper into some of the provided links.
    EDIT: sigh Autonomous Vehicle Competitions, Antimov, Arduino classes. It must be nice to live in Boulder, CO.

    • It really depends on the material. Something like surface mount soldering and hot air rework can only really be learned by someone showing you how to do it, and a video can be helpful but it’s not nearly as effective as seeing is done in front of you and trying it yourself with someone to point out any problems. You can learn it on your own, but I think an hour with someone competent will give you a better return on investment than 100 hours of looking at tutorials on the web.

      • Yes, it does depend on the material, but I don’t think soldering is included. I think the best way to learn those sort of skills is through practice. In fact, I learned techniques to solder SSOPs and even 100 pin TQFPs by watching the soldering tutorials here on the site and then trying it for myself. I don’t think there is anything anyone would tell you differently in person that isn’t in the videos, except maybe don’t change tips with your bare hands if you just turned the iron off.
        Fellow SparkFunions, do not underestimate your ability to learn through doing! Be safe but go nuts!

    • I completely agree, I’d love to go to one of these classes but I live in the UK :(

    • That’s true. Boulder is fantastic!

  • We will not be able to offer live streaming of this class but this remains one of our top priorities for the near future. We will be collecting footage from the February 26th and April 30th classes to create an online resource for this class. Stay tuned!!!

  • I would love to attend in person, but I am North Carolina. I would still pay and attend if you offered a Webex or other webcast option.


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