New Product Friday: Free Socks!

The FreeSoC2 development board, the Anouk Edition Teensy 3.1, and the SparkFun Photon ecosystem!

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Welcome back everyone! Although we don't have a lot of new products this week, the ones we have are pretty important. Also, we have a classic Friday New Product Post Video as well as a demo. It's a good week! We were really busy last week and didn't get a chance to do a proper demo for the MG2639 Cellular Shield. This week Shawn gave it the proper demo it deserves.

Haha, classic Shawn.

FreeSoC2 Development Board - PSoC5LP

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7 Retired

The FreeSoC2 is the big talk of the town today. The PSoC (Programmable System on a Chip) brings together features of the programmable devices and microcontroller-type systems on chips into one package. By placing a programmable fabric between the peripherals and the pins, the FreeSoC2 allows any function to be routed to any pin! Moreover, the on-board PSoC includes a number of programmable blocks which allow the user to define arbitrary digital and analog circuits for their specific application.

Quite simply, YOU get to tell the pins what they are, not the microcontroller. They're your pins, right? You tell them what they should be. In the following weeks we'll be coming out with more tutorials and demos showing you how to use and configure all the hardware that's onboard. For now, check out the FreeSoC2 introduction.

Pink Teensy 3.1 (Anouk Edition)

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Retired

The Pink Teensy 3.1 (Anouk Edition) brings a 32 bit ARM Cortex microprocessor into the mix so you can do some serious number crunching. This special edition Teensy is only available for a limited time while supplies last to help promote Anouk Wipprecht’s work with the Teensy boards. This board is a one-time only product - when it's gone, it's gone. Get them while they last!

Photon Ecosystem

Earlier this week, we had a couple cool announcements about the Photon WiFi module. The first was in regards to Spark IO (of Spark Core fame) changing their name to Particle. The second was to announce our newest product line for the new Particle Photon Module. We have a whole host of new products (currently available for pre-order) all compatible with the Particle Photon. We expect these to ship sometime in June.

Well, that's all I have for this week. Be sure to check back next week, we're not done with new products quite yet. Next week we have even more new stuff up our sleeves (boards are sharp and pointy) so be sure to check back and see what we've got. Thanks for reading and see you then.


Comments 8 comments

  • I like the idea that there are acoustic tiles around the set, but frankly, I liked the appearance of the red boxes in the background of the old set! BTW, what's with the lower right light in the Sparkfun sign? It sometimes seems to not get to the "current" color until the ones on the other end have already started to change to the next color!

    The GF is wanting me, so I don't have time to check the FreeSoC2 page to see if there's a RTCC included...

    • Thanks for watching!

    • Yeah, we spent a lot of time building the new set. It's here to stay. I'm not sure what the deal is with that LED, we'll get around to figuring it out someday. A bit low on our priority list at the moment! :)

    • OK, now that things have been quiet on the "Girl Friend front" for a while, I've had time to dig though the documentation a bit. Although there is a hopeful sign of having a space for a 32.716 kHz XTAL on the PCB, upon further investigation it appears that implementing an actual RTCC would be "software", meaning that this Cypress chip doesn't have a hardware RTCC that can run off a watch battery.

      Of the ideas that cross my mind to build with a sub-$50 board, at least 95% of them require a battery-backed RTCC. Having to add an RTCC to any form of "shield" usually kills the idea.

  • Can't wait to get my Free soc!

  • Whoo so pumped to see you guys carrying the freesoc, I've been playing around with the ones I got from the kick-started...2hours ago, being able to design circuits as a hardware function and not just with code, one of the biggest limits I've come across is a lot of the cypress designed blocks for say the dac/adc, mixer, stuff that has an option to use the internet clock is limited to 1MHz, so if you wanted to do a nice 100 step sine wave with the dac...no dice, even though you can set the internal master to upto 64MHz with just the internal timing circuit.

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