×

Our Technical Support team will be out of the office on Wednesday, April 23 starting at 12pm. Tech Support will reopen with normal hours on Thursday, April 24 at 9am. Thank you

Copenhagen Video Part II


A couple weeks ago, we posted the first part of a three part video recap of our trip to Copenhagen. We traveled out there last September to check out Copenhagen Suborbitals. Recently, they were able to launch their rocket so we are revisiting our trip. Check out the video below for part two of our epic journey, as we discover yet another hacker space in Denmark:

As you can probably guess, it was a ton of fun. Nate (SparkFun CEO), Juan (our photographer), and a couple others traveled to Denmark for a trip filled with hacker spaces, inspiration, and rockets. What more could you ask for? Keep an eye out in the next week or so for the thrilling conclusion of our three part video series! 


Comments 20 comments

  • Nice Video! The “RepRap 3D Printer” like the one shown would be a nice product for “SparkFun” to sell. “MakerBot” has a nice 3D printer too!

  • If you are ever in San Francisco, come on over to Noisebridge, we even have a scanning electron microscope!

  • Observation:
    I’ve never actually seen anyone make an actual prototype part with a RepRap on the web. All I see are people making inefficient items like whistles and coat hooks… and of course, parts for other Rep Raps.
    I’m considering getting one? But I’m afraid they’re not capable of making anything I can use based on that.
    Why would I want to make a whistle or a coat hook? Or a model of some guy’s head? Where are all the people using them to make robot prototypes? And why aren’t the RepRap people linking to them?

    • This is an interesting unscientific strength test of printed parts that I found.
      http://www.youtube.com/user/RepRapLogPhase#p/a/u/2/qlPMBDqKRUo

      • That was perfect! Thanks for finding that.
        It was a rough view, but close enough. It also showed the viability of using the printed parts as forms to make castings.
        Obviously, the printing resolution isn’t the same as a 15 thousand dollar machine will produce, I don’t think I would even try to make small gears, for example. but it’s certainly sufficient for a lot of stuff.
        A particularly attractive point for me is the possibility of going straight from CAD to 3D print to sand casting. I’ll have to add “Set up foundry” to my to-do list.

    • The parts they make can be weak between the layers.

      • Hmm… would robot part proto'ing on the MakerBot CupCake be possible? ‘Cause in MAKE Issue 21 there was an article about it and said the objects printed were so strong you could stand on them without them breaking.
        I lost my favorite issue of MAKE, I think it was 22. I must have lost it at that gymnastics meet (my sister USED to be on a team (before the coach and this one hypocritical student started to drive her crazy)) where I ALMOST lost 2 OTHER Issues. :,^(

      • Is that right? So you’re saying they would tend to delaminate? That would be bad. It does seem that the RepRap’s RepRap parts seem to have holes for the rods that make up the frame through them… thus holding them together.
        I made an .stl file from an AutoCad model, it was a piece of cake. I can’t see how it would be so hard to use that to make a custom part on the repRap, yet… no one seems to do that.

  • Trying to start one down here…there are none in a 100- 200 mi radius.

  • June 22, 2011 Sparkfun invented a time Machine! yay

  • I live in Denmark, but never heard about this hacker space!

    • Never? There are some in DK. I know i CPH (Labitat) and one i Aalborg. Dunno what it’s called. :-)

      • There are also one in Aarhus called “Hack Aarhus” or “Open Space Aarhus”.
        I am also trying to start one here in Holstebro (DK too), and I might be able to get some funds from the government to rent the rooms and buy some of the equipment.
        Best Regards
        Thomas Jespersen
        TKJ Electronics

  • wow!!! I’d love to visit and learn from everyone over there :] I need to get more into electronics! It’s just such a wide world and sooooo many things to discover and create!!! It’s amazing!!!

  • I had never heard of these “Hacker Spaces” prior to yesterday. Interesting! Now I wanna know how it works on an economic and liability level. To the intertubes!

    • Hackerspaces are a worldwide trend. You can find a list here and see if there is one in your area. The Montreal hackerspace is Foulab.
      The way it works is a bunch of people form a legal association, rent a place, fill it with all kinds of tools from oscilloscopes to CNC routers and a beer fridge, so that the shared resources can be used by members for their projects. Workshops on subjects ranging from Linux security to Arduino or woodworking are often given by volunteer members.
      Usually, there is an open/social day every week, everyone is welcome. Get there, talk with the people and you’ll know quite fast if you belong there or not. Membership is usually between 25$ and 60$/month, some pay with hardware donations or by giving workshops.
      Regarding liability, the hackerspace does have a responsibility insurance just like any other non profit association. Risk is no higher than any outdoor activity group.


This Week

This Month

Heartbleed

Happy Arduino Day!